costar

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

co- +‎ star

Noun[edit]

costar (plural costars)

  1. (acting) A person who shares star billing.
    The once famous actor objected to his costar having a bigger dressing room.
  2. (acting) A person who slightly lacks the status to be considered a star.
    Alas, always a costar but never a star.

Verb[edit]

costar (third-person singular simple present costars, present participle costarring, simple past and past participle costarred)

  1. to perform with the billing of a costar.
    People thought his career was over but now he will get to costar on Broadway next month.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō.

Verb[edit]

costar

  1. to cost (to incur a charge, a price)

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō.

Verb[edit]

costar (first-person singular present costo, past participle costat)

  1. to cost (have a given price)
    • 2009, Jean Grave, Les Aventures d'en Nono:
      Digues, mare, quant costarà un llibre de contes[?]
      Tell me, mother, how much does a story book cost?
  2. to be very difficult

Conjugation[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō.

Verb[edit]

costar

  1. to cost

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō.

Verb[edit]

costar (first-person singular present cuesto, first-person singular preterite costé, past participle costado)

  1. to cost
  2. to find (something) very difficult, to have a hard time with something
    Cuando estoy de pie, me cuesta respirar.
    When I'm standing, I find it hard to breathe.
    Le cuesta mucho pronunciar esa palabra.
    He has a really hard time pronouncing that word.

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō. Compare Italian costare.

Verb[edit]

costar

  1. (intransitive) to cost

Conjugation[edit]