introitus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin introitus.

Pronunciation[edit]

singular
plural

Noun[edit]

introitus (plural introitus)

  1. (medicine) The entrance to a hollow organ or canal; often specifically the entrance to the vagina.
    • 1980: Thomas Alexander Stamey, Pathogenesis and Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections, page 144 (Williams & Wilkins; ISBN 0683079093, 9780683079098)
      During NA therapy, 49 of the 54 women cleared their introitus of all Enterobacteriaceae.
    • 1988 January 29, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”:
      Now, far be it from me to add insult to injury, but how could you be so klutzy that you "missed the introitus"?
    • 1993: Daniel Carleton Gajdusek, Melanesian journal: expedition to New Hebrides, Solomon Islands, Manus, New Britain, and New Guinea, 23 January 1965 to 7 April 1965, page 90 (Study of Child Growth and Development and Disease Patterns in Primitive Cultures, Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health)
      There is nothing feminine about these male pseudohermaphrodites except their introitus, and they seem to be normally male otherwise.
  2. (music) A piece of music played before a mass; a musical introduction of any sort.
    • 1954: Gustave Reese, Music in the Renaissance, page 22 (W.W. Norton)
      Five have an introitus (introduction) that stands outside the isorhythmic scheme;108 some of these introitus are instrumental rather than vocal […]
    • 1992: Jon Michael Allsen, Style and intertextuality in the isorhythmic motet 1400–1440, volume 1, page 118 (University of Wisconsin–Madison)
      As summarized in Example 3.14, nearly all of these introitus […]
  3. Alternative spelling of introit

Quotations[edit]

  • 1955: Geoffrey Chaucer, Richard Middlewood Wilson, Simon Bredon, Derek John de Solla Price, and Peterhouse (University of Cambridge) Library, The Equatorie of the Planetis, page 161 (Cambridge University Press)
    It seems that many such technical words (grada, minuta, introitus) were left in the uninflected state when contracted in any customary form such as we have […]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From introeō (I go within, I enter), from intrō (into) + (I go).

Pronunciation[edit]

nominative and vocative singular
genitive singular and nominative, accusative, and vocative plural

Noun[edit]

introitus m (genitive introitūs); fourth declension

  1. A going in or into, entering; entrance.
  2. A place of entrance; passage; mouth of a river.
  3. (figuratively) An entering or entrance into an office or a society; entrance fee.
  4. (figuratively) A beginning, introduction, prelude.

Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative introitus introitūs
genitive introitūs introituum
dative introituī introitibus
accusative introitum introitūs
ablative introitū introitibus
vocative introitus introitūs

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • introitus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879