lace

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: lacé

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Old French las, from Vulgar Latin *laceum, based on Latin laqueus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lace (countable and uncountable, plural laces)

  1. (uncountable) A light fabric containing patterns of holes, usually built up from a single thread.
    • Francis Bacon
      Our English dames are much given to the wearing of costly laces.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 2, The Mirror and the Lamp[1]:
      She was a fat, round little woman, richly apparelled in velvet and lace, […]; and the way she laughed, cackling like a hen, the way she talked to the waiters and the maid, […]—all these unexpected phenomena impelled one to hysterical mirth, and made one class her with such immortally ludicrous types as Ally Sloper, the Widow Twankey, or Miss Moucher.
  2. (countable) A cord or ribbon passed through eyelets in a shoe or garment, pulled tight and tied to fasten the shoe or garment firmly.
  3. A snare or gin, especially one made of interwoven cords; a net.
    • Chaucer
      Vulcanus had caught thee [Venus] in his lace.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairfax to this entry?)
  4. (slang, obsolete) Spirits added to coffee or another beverage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lace (third-person singular simple present laces, present participle lacing, simple past and past participle laced)

  1. (transitive) To fasten (something) with laces.
  2. (transitive) To add alcohol, poison, a drug or anything else potentially harmful to (food or drink).
  3. (transitive) To interweave items. (lacing one's fingers together)
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, The Celebrity:
      Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, the boards giving back the clatter of our horses' feet: or anon we shot into a clearing, with a colored glimpse of the lake and its curving shore far below us.
  4. (transitive) To interweave the spokes of a bicycle wheel.
  5. To beat; to lash; to make stripes on.
  6. To adorn with narrow strips or braids of some decorative material.
    cloth laced with silver
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lace

  1. wearily

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

lace

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lacer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of lacer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of lacer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of lacer
  5. second-person singular imperative of lacer

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

lace

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of laciō

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

lace

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of laçar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of laçar
  3. first-person singular imperative of laçar
  4. third-person singular imperative of laçar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

lace

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of lazar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of lazar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of lazar.