porter

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman portour, from Old French porteor, from Latin portātor, from past participle of portare (to carry)

Noun[edit]

porter (plural porters)

  1. A person who carries luggage and related objects.
    By the time I reached the train station I was exhausted, but fortunately there was a porter waiting.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman portour, from Old French portier, from Late Latin portarius (gatekeeper), from porta (gate).

Noun[edit]

porter (plural porters)

  1. A person in control of the entrance to a building.
  2. In the bowling industry, an employee who clears and cleans tables and puts bowling balls away.
  3. A strong, dark ale, originally favored by porters, similar to a stout but less strong.
  4. (Ireland) Stout (malt brew).
  5. (computing) One who ports software (converts it to another platform).
Coordinate terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

porter (third-person singular simple present porters, present participle portering, simple past and past participle portered)

  1. to serve as a porter, to carry.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

porter m (plural porters)

  1. goalkeeper

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin portō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

porter

  1. to carry
  2. to support, to bear
  3. to wear
  4. (of a subject) to be about, to concern
  5. (reflexive, se porter) to feel
    Je me porte mieux. — I am feeling better.
    Il se porte bien. — He's in good health.
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English porter.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

porter m (plural porters)

  1. porter (beer)
    • 1884, Joris-Karl Huysmans, À rebours, XI:
      il […] étancha sa soif avec le porter, cette bière noire qui sent le jus de réglisse dépouillé de sucre.
      He quenched his thirst with some porter, that dark beer which smells of unsweetened liquorice.

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French porter, from Latin portō, portāre.

Verb[edit]

porter

  1. to carry

Derived terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin portāre, present active infinitive of portō (bring, carry).

Verb[edit]

porter

  1. to carry

Conjugation[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

porter

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of portō

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin portō.

Verb[edit]

porter

  1. to carry
    porter la banniere
    to carry the banner

Conjugation[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin portō.

Verb[edit]

porter

  1. to carry
    porter la baniere
    to carry the banner

Conjugation[edit]

  • This verb conjugates the same as a verb ending in -er. In addition, the forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are reduced to just -z, -t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.