ale

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See also: Ale, alè, alẽ, and åle

English[edit]

a pint of ale (1)

Etymology[edit]

Old English ealu, ealo, from Proto-Germanic *alu (compare Dutch aal, Swedish öl), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂elu- ‘bitter’. Compare Latin alum (comfrey), alūta (tawed leather), Ancient Greek ἀλύδοιμος (alúdoimos, bitter), and Albanian all (of reddish colour)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ale (countable and uncountable, plural ales)

  1. An intoxicating liquor made from an infusion of malt by fermentation and the addition of a bitter, usually hops.
    Note: The word ale, in England and the United States, usually designates a heavier kind of fermented liquor, and the word beer a lighter kind. The word beer is also in common use as the generic name for all non-distilled malt liquors.
  2. A festival in English country places, so called from the liquor drunk.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

ale

  1. grain

Declension[edit]



Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ale

  1. but

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortened from alennusmyynti (selling of goods at bargain prices).

Noun[edit]

ale

  1. (colloquial) sale
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English ale

Noun[edit]

ale

  1. ale
Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ale.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ale f (plural ales)

  1. ale
    • 1884, Joris-Karl Huysmans, À rebours, XI:
      il mangea un rosbif aux pommes et s'enfourna deux pintes d’ale, excité par ce petit goût de vacherie musquée que dégage cette fine et pâle bière.
      He ate roast beef with apples and put away two pints of ale, excited by the little taste of musky trickery given off by this fine, pale beer.

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin āla.

Noun[edit]

ale f (plural alis)

  1. wing

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French aller (go).

Verb[edit]

ale

  1. go

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.le/
  • Hyphenation: à‧le

Noun[edit]

ale f

  1. (poetic) plural form of ala; wings.

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

ale

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of alō

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ale

  1. but

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French aller.

Verb[edit]

ale (medial form al)

  1. To go

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

ale (plural ales)

  1. ale (beverage)

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ale

  1. but
    Grałem dobrze, ale przegrałem
    I played well, but I lost.

Particle[edit]

ale

  1. expressing wonder
    Ale masz piękną sukienkę!
    You have such a beautiful dress!

Etymology 2[edit]

From English ale.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ale n (indeclinable)

  1. ale (beer)

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

ale

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of alar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of alar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of alar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of alar

Romanian[edit]

Article[edit]

ale (feminine/neuter plural possessive article)

  1. of
    sunt ale mele aici? - are mine here?

See also[edit]

  • al (masculine/neuter singular)
  • a (feminine singular)
  • ai (masculine plural)

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ali, *ale.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /âle/
  • Hyphenation: a‧le

Conjunction[edit]

ȁle (Cyrillic spelling а̏лe)

  1. (Kajkavian) but
  2. (Kajkavian) however

Tarantino[edit]

Noun[edit]

ale

  1. wing (of a bird etc)