aller

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: aller- and Aller

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

aller

  1. of all; genitive form of al
    Tot op heden is Van Beethoven nog steeds één van de beroemdste en meest invloedrijke musici aller tijden. — Up to this day, Beethoven is still one of the most famous and most influential musicians of all times!

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A syncretic verb.

The all- forms derive from Old French aler, alier (with subjunctive aill- and other forms with all-), from Vulgar Latin alare (attested in the 7th century Reichenau Glosses). This has traditionally been explained as deriving from Latin ambulare via or together with ambler (compare Old Provençal amblar, Italian ambiare, Romanian umbla), but this explanation is phonologically problematic. Several theories have been put forth since the 17th century to explain how ambulare could have become aller.[1] Since at least the 18th century, some have suggested that aller derives not from Latin but from Celtic,[2][3] Gaulish *aliu: compare Welsh elen (I was going), Cornish ellev (I may go), and also Franco-Provençal alâ, allar and Friulan (to go) (compare lin (we go), lât (gone)).

Latin vādō (go) supplies the present tense forms and īre, present active infinitive of , supplies the future and conditional.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aller

  1. (intransitive) to go
    Nous devons aller à l'école. — “We must go to school.”
    J’irai au magasin. — “I will go to the store.”
  2. (when followed by an infinitive verb) to be going (to); will soon; forms a near-future tense
    Il allait visiter sa famille. — “He was going to visit his family.”
    Je vais aller au magasin. — “I will go to the store.”
    Tout ira bien - “All will be well.”
  3. to be (feeling)
    J'espère que tu vas bien. — “I hope you are well.”
  4. to go well with (clothes, colors, etc.)

Conjugation[edit]

  • The verb aller has a unique and highly irregular conjugation.
  • Aller has an irregular imperative in the expression vas-y.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

aller m (plural allers)

  1. Outward trip; journey out; trip away (implying not returning)

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1939, D. A. Paton, On the origin of aller, in Studies in French Language and Mediaeval Literature, page 301: The opinion that ambulare is the origin of aller has been and is held by so many eminent etymologists that it is with some diffidence I venture to suggest another source. [...] By these suggestions I am not attempting to prove that aller and ambler are of different origin, but only to show that such a theory is not only possible, but probable. The real and to my mind insuperable objection to ambulare as the source of aller is the phonetic question, and here we find that the supporters of ambulare, in explaining its unique development, arrive at their common conclusion by entirely different routes. Ducange would take aller as coming from ambler. Schuchardt's reasoning is as follows: — ambulare > *ammulare > *amlare > aller. [...] More recently, Meyer-Lübke's view is that ambulare was simply contracted to *allare, the contraction being particularly natural in the imperative mood. Gammillscheg also points out that ambulate, used in the army as a word of command, would easily be shortened to *alate.
  2. ^ 1773, Charles Vallancey, A Grammar of the Iberno-Celtic, Or Irish Language, page 84: aill, go thou [...] from hence aller the French verb, to go
  3. ^ 1873, Louis A. Languellier, H. M. Monsanto, A pratical course with the French language, page 487: "words which [...] belong to the ancient Gallic or Celtic speech [...include] aller, to go"

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

aller

  1. Masculine nominative form of alles ("all", as in "all of you").
  2. Feminine dative form of alles.
  3. Feminine genitive form of alles.
  4. Plural genitive form of alles.

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French aler, alier, from Vulgar Latin alare, from Gaulish *aliu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aller

  1. to go

Antonyms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

aller

  1. Alternative form of aler

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aller

  1. older

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Central Scots
    • (West Central Scots) IPA(key): /ˈɛlər/
  • Southern Scots

Noun[edit]

aller (plural allers)

  1. alder.