prudent

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English[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Middle French prudent, from Latin prūdēns, contracted from prōvidēns (foresight) (English providence), the past participle of prōvideō (I forsee). Unrelated to prude.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prudent (comparative more prudent, superlative most prudent)

  1. Sagacious in adapting means to ends; circumspect in action, or in determining any line of conduct; careful, discreet, sensible; -- opposed to rash; directed by prudence or wise forethought; evincing prudence;
    • 1864, Jules Verne, chapter 30, A Journey to the Center of the Earth[1]:
      He did not hesitate what to do. It would be prudent to continue on to Omaha, for it would be dangerous to return to the train, which the Indians might still be engaged in pillaging.
    • Moses established a grave and prudent law. --Milton.
  2. Practically wise, judicious, shrewd
    His prudent career moves reliably brought him to the top
  3. Frugal; economical; not extravagant;
    Only prudent expenditure may provide quality within a restrictive budget

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Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prudent m (feminine prudente, masculine plural prudents, feminine plural prudentes)

  1. prudent

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