veg

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See also: vég

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortened form of various related words including vegetable, vegetarian, and vegetate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

veg (not comparable)

  1. vegetarian
    • 2007, Tom Masters, Eastern Europe[1], Lonely Planet, ISBN 1741044766, page 120:
      The food's lip-smackingly good with some veg options, and there's a ham and eggs breakfast for 3KM.

Noun[edit]

veg (plural vegs or veg)

  1. (colloquial) vegetable.
    • 2002, Tom Grahn, "Food compositions and methods of preparing the same", US Patent 6814975 [2], page 5,
      Secondary foodstuffs are exemplified by the following prepared dishes: vegetarian steaks, gratinated vegs, oven made lasagne, fish and ham with potatoes, []
    • 2004, Marion Halligan, The Taste of Memory[3], ISBN 1741143128, page 185:
      [] meals of meat and three veg were mostly the same three veg, beans peas potatoes, or peas carrots potatoes.
Usage notes[edit]
  • In colloquial speech this is usually pluralized simply as "veg."
  • In writing this may or may not be followed by a period to mark it as an abbreviation.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

veg (third-person singular simple present vegges, present participle vegging, simple past and past participle vegged)

  1. (colloquial) to vegetate; to engage in complete inactivity; to rest
    After working hard all week, I decided to stay home and veg on Saturday.
    And he just sits and vegges on the TV, munches nachos, whatever.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Coined in a 1948 paper in the American Journal of Psychology by Robert S. Harper and S. S. Stevens.[5], [6]

Noun[edit]

veg (plural vegs)

  1. (psychology) A unit of subjective weight, equivalent to the perceived weight of lifting 100 grams.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse veikr, from Proto-Germanic *waikwaz.

Adjective[edit]

veg (neuter vegt, definite and plural vege, comparative vegere, superlative vegest)

  1. weak, yielding

Verb[edit]

veg

  1. past tense of vige

Norwegian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Bokmål) vei

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vegr, from Proto-Germanic *wegaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-.

Noun[edit]

veg

  1. road
  2. way
  3. direction

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]