óc

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Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier óac, from Proto-Celtic *yowankos (compare Welsh ieuanc), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós (compare English young).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

óc (comparative óa, superlative óam)

  1. young

Inflection[edit]

o/ā-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative óc óc óc
Vocative óic*
óc**
Accusative óc óic
Genitive óic óice óic
Dative óc óic óc
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative óic óca
Vocative ócu
óca
Accusative ócu
óca
Genitive óc
Dative ócaib
Notes *modifying a noun whose vocative is different from its nominative

**modifying a noun whose vocative is identical to its nominative
† not when substantivized

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: óg
  • Manx: aeg
  • Scottish Gaelic: òg

Noun[edit]

óc m

  1. young man
  2. warrior

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative óc ócL óicL
Vocative óic ócL ócuH
Accusative ócN ócL ócuH
Genitive óicL óc ócN
Dative ócL ócaib ócaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
óc unchanged n-óc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “óc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language


Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *c-ʔɔːk, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *ʔuək ~ *huək (brains). Cognate with Bahnar 'ngok, Nyaheun tʔɔk and Besisi ʔatɔk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(classifier bộ, khối) óc (𩠭, 𫇂, 𫘴)

  1. (rather informal or literary) brain (organ)
    Synonym: não
  2. brains (as food)
  3. (in compounds) a sense (of something)
    óc hài hước
    sense of humor

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms