господин

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Bulgarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gospodinъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ɡospoˈdin]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

господи́н (gospodínm (feminine госпожа́)

  1. mister, Mr, sir
  2. gentleman

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • господин”, in Речник на българския език [Dictionary of the Bulgarian Language] (in Bulgarian), Sofia: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2014
  • господин”, in Речник на българския език [Dictionary of the Bulgarian Language] (in Bulgarian), Chitanka, 2010

Macedonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gospodinъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡɔspɔdin]
  • IPA(key): [ɡɔsˈpɔdin] (nonstandard)
  • Hyphenation: гос‧по‧дин

Noun[edit]

го́сподин (góspodinm (plural го́спода, feminine го́споѓа)

  1. (formal, term of address) mister, sir, Mr. (polite, formal term of address to a man)
    Synonym: (abbreviation) г. (g.)
  2. gentleman (a man of a high rank or position)

Usage notes[edit]

  • The pronunciation of госпо́дин is sometimes used in a jokingly, sarcastic way, but it's considered nonstandard.
  • The abbreviations г-н and г-дин can also be found among Macedonians, but they're actually nonstandard. The only correct abbreviation is г. (the full stop is a must), which can also be an abbreviation for "year".

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • господин” in Дигитален речник на македонскиот јазик (Digitalen rečnik na makedonskiot jazik) [Digital dictionary of the Macedonian language] − drmj.eu

Russian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gospodinъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

господи́н (gospodínm anim (genitive господи́на, nominative plural господа́, genitive plural госпо́д, feminine госпожа́, relational adjective госпо́дский)

  1. gentleman (a man of a high rank or position)
  2. (formal, term of address) mister, Mr., sir (polite, formal term of address to a man)
    Synonym: (abbreviation) г-н (g-n)
  3. lord, master (the master of a household of servants or a manor)
    Synonyms: хозя́ин (xozjáin), (historical) ба́рин (bárin)
    служи́ть двум господа́мslužítʹ dvum gospodámto serve two masters

Usage notes[edit]

Since the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the word "товарищ" ("comrade") being commonly used as a term of respect when addressing others, "господи́н" (and its feminine equivalent "госпожа́") are sometimes said to have returned as the Russian equivalent of "Mr." or "Ms." While they may be translated in this way, in daily practice these terms remain very rarely used by Russians. "Господин" is used primarily in news broadcasts (often when it is necessary to translate the foreign term "Mr."), in very formal written correspondence, or in certain, very formal situations among businessmen or civil servants.

When addressing someone respectfully, Russians most commonly use First Name + Patronymic. The adjective "уважаемый/ая" (lit. "respected") may be added for additional politeness. If they need to get a stranger's attention, Russians simply use the terms "мужчина" ("man), "молодой человек" ("young man"), "девушка" ("girl"), or "женщина" ("woman"). In other cases when someone's name and/or title is unknown, Russians simply address them in "V-Form."

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gospodinъ, from *gospodь (lord, master).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡospǒdin/
  • Hyphenation: гос‧по‧дин

Noun[edit]

госпо̀дин m (Latin spelling gospòdin)

  1. gentleman
  2. mister
  3. Mr.
  4. sir

Declension[edit]

References[edit]