Admiral

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See also: admiral and admirál

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French amirail, amiral (modern amiral), from Arabic أَمِير الْبَحْر (ʾamīr al-baḥr, commander of the fleet). Later associated with admirable. Akin to amir, Amir and emir.

First recorded in English September, 1300, to refer to Gerard Allard of Winchelsea, referred to as “Admiral of the Fleet of the Cinque Ports”. [1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Admiral (uncountable)

  1. (military) A naval officer title

German[edit]

German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Admiral m (genitive Admirals, plural Admirale or Admiräle)

  1. admiral

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ^ The Mastery of the Sea, by Cyril Field, page 234
  • ^ Admiral” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2017.