Sophia

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See also: sophia

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Chiefly from Latin Sophia, from Ancient Greek Σοφία (Sophía), from σοφία (sophía, wisdom), especially in reference to holy or divine wisdom under the influence of Biblical Hebrewחוכמה(khokhmá), to the early martyr St. Sophia, and to many figures of European royalty and nobility. Also used as a calque for the many cognate forms, such as Italian Sofia, Russian Софи́я (Sofíja), Polish Zofia, etc.

Proper noun[edit]

Sophia

  1. A female given name from Ancient Greek.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling:
      To say the truth, Sophia, when very young, discerned that Tom, though an idle, thoughtless, rattling rascal, was nobody's enemy but his own []
    • 1766, Oliver Goldsmith, The Vicar of Wakefield:
      I intended to call her after Aunt Grizel, but my wife who, during pregnancy, had been reading romances, insisted upon her being called Olivia. In less than another year we had another daughter, and now I was determined that Grizel should be her name; but a rich relation taking a fancy to stand godmother, the girl was, by her directions, called Sophia, so that we had two romantic names in the family, but I solemnly protest I had no hand in it.
    • 1998 Anne Tyler, A Patchwork Planet, A.A.Knopf Inc., page 2:
      Gram said, "Sophia. Would that be an Italian name?" "It came from a great-aunt," Sophia told her, turning briefly in her direction. "Was your great-aunt Italian?" "No, Scottish." "Oh." I knew what Gram was aiming at here. She wanted to find out whether Sophia was Catholic. She poked her headful of pink curlers forward for a moment and looked at me. "Presbyterian, " I told her. "Oh." She sat back again, Oh, well, you could see her thinking, her own daughter had married Episcopal and the sky hadn't fallen in. "It's a pretty name, anyhow," she told Sophia. "Thank you." "I like names that end with an a, don't you? []
  2. (Gnosticism) An aeon (a form of divine being) in the Gnostic tradition.
  3. A town in West Virginia, United States; named for early resident Sophia McGinnis.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See Sophy.

Noun[edit]

Sophia (plural Sophias)

  1. (historical) Archaic spelling of Safawi.
    • 1578 May 16, “[letter]”, in Arthur John Butler, editor, Calendar of state papers, Foreign series, of the reign of Elizabeth, 1578–1579, London: Public Record Office, published 1903, →OCLC:
      It is written from Constantinople that the 'Sophia' of Persia is dead and that his brother had taken the government.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Sophia.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Sophia, from Ancient Greek σοφία (sophía, wisdom).

Proper noun[edit]

Sophia

  1. a female given name from English [in turn from Ancient Greek]

Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sophia

  1. a female given name, variant of Sofie

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [zoˈfiːa]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: So‧phi‧a

Proper noun[edit]

Sophia f (proper noun, genitive Sophias, plural Sophias or Sophien)

  1. a female given name, equivalent to English Sophia

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sophia c (genitive Sophias)

  1. a female given name, a less common spelling of Sofia

Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Sophia, from Ancient Greek σοφία (sophía, wisdom).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: So‧phi‧a
  • IPA(key): /soˈfia/, [soˈfi.ɐ]
  • IPA(key): /soˈpia/, [soˈpi.ɐ]

Proper noun[edit]

Sophia (Baybayin spelling ᜐᜓᜉᜒᜀ)

  1. a female given name from English [in turn from Ancient Greek]