Trauer

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See also: trauer

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German trūre (mourning), from Old High German trūrēn (to mourn), from Proto-Germanic *dreusaną (to fall) or *dreuzagaz (sad), both from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrews- (to break apart).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʁaʊ̯ɐ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ̯ɐ
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Trauer f (genitive Trauer, no plural)

  1. grief, sorrow
    Antonyms: Begeisterung, Euphorie, Freude, Fröhlichkeit, Frohsinn, Glück, Seligkeit, Triumph, Wohlgemut, Wohlgefallen, Zufriedenheit
  2. mourning
    Synonym: Trauerzeit

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Trauer m or f (proper noun, surname, masculine genitive Trauers or (with an article) Trauer, feminine genitive Trauer, plural Trauers or Trauer)

  1. a surname

References[edit]

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1883), “Trauer”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891

Further reading[edit]

  • Trauer” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Trauer” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Trauer” in Duden online
  • Wikipedia-logo.svg Trauer on the German Wikipedia.Wikipedia de

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German trūre (mourning), from Old High German trūrēn (to mourn), from Proto-Germanic *dreusaną (to fall) or *dreuzagaz (sad), both from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrews- (to break apart).

Noun[edit]

Trauer f

  1. mourning
    Eere Trauer dud meer Leed.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Further reading[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German trūre (mourning), from Old High German trūrēn (to mourn), from Proto-Germanic *dreusaną (to fall) or *dreuzagaz (sad), both from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrews- (to break apart).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Trauer f (uncountable)

  1. mourning, grief

Related terms[edit]