abactor

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin abactor (cattle rustler), from abigō (drive away); from ab (from, away from) + agō (drive).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abactor (plural abactors)

  1. (law, obsolete) One who steals and drives away cattle or beasts by herds or droves; a cattle rustler. [Attested from the mid 17th century until the early 19th century.][2]
    • 1659, H. Hammond, A Paraphrase and Annotations Upon the Books of the Psalms:
      [] not only from straying, but, as in time of warr, from invaders and abactors []

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], →ISBN), page 3
  2. ^ “abactor” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 2.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From abigō (drive away), from ab (from, away from) + agō (drive).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abāctor m (genitive abāctōris); third declension

  1. A cattle thief; abactor or rustler.
    • c. 125 CE – 180 CE, Apuleius, Metamorphoses 7.26:
      ...meum vero Bellerophontem abactorem indubitatum cruentumque percussorem criminantes...
      ...and as for my Bellerophon, they accused him of being an undoubted rustler and a bloody murderer.
    • c. 300 CE – 400 CE, Julius Paulus Prudentissimus, Pauli Sententiae V.18:
      Abactores sunt qui unum equum, duas equas, totidemque boves, vel capram decem, aut porcos quinque abegerint.
      Rustlers are those who drive away one stallion, two mares, as many cattle, or ten goats, or five pigs.
    • c. 600 CE – 625 CE, Isidorus Hispalensis, Etymologiae 10.14:
      Abactor est fur iumentorum, et pecorum, quem vulgo abigeum vocant, ab abigendo scilicet.
      Abactor is a thief of draft animals and domestic animals, whom they call in vulgar Latin abigeus, naturally derived from abigendo.
  2. A man who abducts.
    • c. 334 CE – 337 CE, Julius Firmicus Maternus, Matheseos Libri VIII Liber VI.31.6:
      Si vero in aquosis signis fuerint constituti, pecorum abactores efficient, insequentibus hominibus minaci semper gladio resistentes.
      But if they are arranged in the water signs, they create abductors of domestic animals, opposing chasing men with an ever-threatening sword.
    • c. 343 CE – 350 CE, Julius Firmicus Maternus, De Errore Profanarum Religionum Cap V:
      Virum vero abactorem bovum colentes sacra eius ad ignis transferunt potestatem, sicut propheta eius tradidit nobis dicens...
      Their sacrifices, worshipping that man, abductor of the bull (Mithras), bring power to the fires, as their prophet imparted to us, saying...

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative abāctor abāctōrēs
Genitive abāctōris abāctōrum
Dative abāctōrī abāctōribus
Accusative abāctōrem abāctōrēs
Ablative abāctōre abāctōribus
Vocative abāctor abāctōrēs

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: abactor
  • Portuguese: abactor

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin abactor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abactor m (plural abactores, feminine abactora, feminine plural abactoras)

  1. abactor (cattle thief)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]