amail

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See also: àmail

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From unstressed form of samail.

Conjunction[edit]

amail

  1. as, like
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 24d19
      "amal ṅguidess athir a macc" glosses tamquam pater filios deprecantes
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 19b6
      ro pridchad dúib céssad Críst amal ad-cethe
      Christ's passion has been preached to you as though it were seen
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 26b12
      amal ṅ-dond-foirde ainmm
      as a noun signifies it
  2. when, while

Descendants[edit]

Preposition[edit]

amail ‎(with accusative, lenites)

  1. as, like
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 11a11
      "ní amal inní asóircc" glosses non quasi aërem uerberans
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 72b8
      "amal in n-altain" glosses sicut rasorium

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • "amail" in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • Rudolf Thurneysen, A Grammar of Old Irish (Dublin, 1946), §§168,178,826

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From ad- +‎ mall

Noun[edit]

amail f ‎(genitive singular amaile, plural amailean)

  1. evil, mischief
  2. hinderance

Verb[edit]

amail ‎(past dh'amail, future amailidh, verbal noun amal or amaladh, past participle amailte)

  1. hinder, prevent, stop
  2. entangle, clog
  3. enfringe
  4. choke
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

am ‎(time) +‎ -ail

Adjective[edit]

amail

  1. seasonable, timely, in time
  2. temporal
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
  • (seasonable): eas-amail ‎(unseasonable)

Etymology 3[edit]

From ad- +‎ mill

Adjective[edit]

amail

  1. broken, lost

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

amail m

  1. genitive singular of amal

References[edit]