at-

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English at-, et-, æt-, from Old English æt- (at, near, toward, beyond, away). More at at.

Prefix[edit]

at-

  1. (obsolete, no longer productive) Prefix meaning at, close to, to, away, off.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • at- in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

at-

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍄-

Latvian[edit]

Prefix[edit]

at-

  1. Usually found on verbs (and their derived nouns or adjectives) with the meaning 'away,' or also 'open' (like Russian от- (ot-)).

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English æt-.

Prefix[edit]

at-

  1. Prefix meaning away; toward; to
  2. Prefix meaning at; against
  3. Emphatic prefix meaning intensely or excessively

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: at-

Ojibwe[edit]

Combining form[edit]

at-

  1. stem of atoon

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative form of ant-.

Prefix[edit]

at-

  1. Alternative form of ant-

Etymology 2[edit]

From at (at). More at at

Prefix[edit]

at-

  1. at, toward
    atmorgan (tomorrow)
  2. with
    atsamna (together)

Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

at-

  1. again, back, re-
    at- + ‎hebu (to speak, to say) → ‎ateb (to answer)
    at- + ‎tyfu (to grow) → ‎atyfu (to germinate)
    at- + ‎ffurfio (to form) → ‎atffurfio (to reform, to regenerate)
    Synonym: ail-
  2. affirmative prefix, emphasises prefixed word
    at- + ‎cas (hated, nasty) → ‎atgas (hateful, detestable)

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
at- unchanged unchanged hat-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.