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From be- +‎ rate ‎(to scold, upbraid), from Middle English raten ‎(to scold, chide), from Old Norse hrata ‎(to refuse, reject, slight, find fault with), from Proto-Germanic *hratjaną, *hratōną ‎(to sway, shake), from Proto-Indo-European *krad- ‎(to swing). Cognate with Swedish rata ‎(to reject, refuse, find fault, slight), Norwegian rata ‎(to reject, cast aside), Old English hratian ‎(to rush, hasten).



berate ‎(third-person singular simple present berates, present participle berating, simple past and past participle berated)

  1. (transitive) to chide or scold vehemently
    • 1896, Gilbert Parker, Seats Of The Mighty, ch. 13:
      Gabord, still muttering, turned to us again, and began to berate the soldiers for their laziness.
    • 1914, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Gods of Mars, ch. 21:
      A thousand times I berated myself for being drawn into such a trap as I might have known these pits easily could be.
    • 1917, Jack London, Jerry of the Islands, ch. 14:
      Lenerengo, as usual, forgot everything else in the fiercer pleasure of berating her spouse.
    • 2008, Alex Perry, "The Man Who Would Be (Congo's) King," Time, 27 Nov.:
      During the rally, he berates the crowd for their cowardice.
    • 2011, Tom Fordyce, Rugby World Cup 2011: England 12-19 France [1]
      France were supposedly a team in pieces, beaten by Tonga just a week ago and with coach Marc Lievremont publicly berating his players, but so clear-cut was their victory that much of the atmosphere had been sucked from the contest long before the end.


Related terms[edit]






  1. First-person singular present of beraten.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of beraten.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of beraten.
  4. Imperative singular of beraten.