brek

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See also: Bręk

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening.

Noun[edit]

brek (countable and uncountable, plural breks)

  1. (informal) breakfast

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

brek

  1. Eye dialect spelling of break.
    • 1897, William O. Stoddard, Crowded Out o' Crofield[1]:
      "They were goin' to brek into me house, indade," said Mrs. McNamara.
    • 1900, Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Strength of Gideon and Other Stories[2]:
      At a very early age his shrill voice could be heard calling in admonitory tones, caught from his mother's very lips, "You 'Nelius, don' you let me ketch you th'owin' at ol' mis' guinea-hens no mo'; you hyeah me?" or "Hi'am, you come offen de top er dat shed 'fo' you fall an' brek yo' naik all to pieces."
    • 1715, S.R. Crockett, Bog-Myrtle and Peat[3]:
      If that's Gavin Stevenson, the muckle nowt, I declare I'll brek his ramshackle blunderbuss owre his thick heid."

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brek m

  1. crying

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

brek c (plural brekken, diminutive brekje)

  1. break, fracture
  2. fraction

Further reading[edit]

  • brek (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011