cae

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Cae, CAE, caé, -cae, ca'e, ca'é, and cáe

Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

cae m (genitive singular cae, nominative plural caenna)

  1. Alternative form of caoth (boghole, swamp-hole; ditch)

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cae chae gcae
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cae

  1. inflection of caer:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh kay (hedge; enclosure), from Proto-Brythonic *kaɨ, from Proto-Celtic *kagyom.

Compare Cornish ke, Breton kae, Old Irish caí; also Latin cohum, English haw). See also cau and caer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cae m (plural caeau)

  1. field
    • 2020 May 19, BBC Cymru Fyw[1]:
      Roedd llond cae ar ôl cae o'r blodau yma, ac roedd o'n arfer rhoi arwyddion o gwmpas y caeau i ddweud bod y cnwd wedi ei chwistrellu gyda phlaladdwr gwenwynig. Fel arall roedd ceir yn stopio wrth ochr y caeau ar ôl gweld môr o'r blodau hardd yma, a rhieni yn dod allan o'r car efo'u plant i eistedd yng nghanol y caeau - heb sylweddoli beth oedden nhw!
      There was field after field full of these flowers, and he used to put signs around the fields saying that the crop had been sprayed with poisonous pesticides. Otherwise cars would stop at the side of the fields after seeing a sea of these beautiful flowers, and parents would get out of their cars with their children to sit in the middle of the fields – without realising what they were!
  2. (sports) pitch
    • 2021 August 13, BBC Cymru Fyw[2]:
      Dwi'n cofio wnaethon ni grys Yr Iseldiroedd, ac fe wnaethon ni e mewn oren mwy llachar. Roedd hynny'n fodern a chyffrous, ac oedden nhw'n edrych yn dda ar y cae.
      I remember we made the Dutch shirt, and we made it in a brigher orange. That was modern and exciting, and they looked good on the pitch.

Usage notes[edit]

The word cae is the usual word for a field as found in the countryside. The term maes is used when referring to a field used for a specific purpose, such as maes glo (coalfield), maes y gad (battlefield), maes glanio (airfield), although an exception to this are sports terms, which may use cae instead, such as cae pêl-droed (football pitch). Maes is also used when referring to more figurative fields, such as a database or gravitational field or a field of interest, and is often found in place of cae in botanical names and literary language.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cae

  1. (literary) third-person singular present indicative/future of cau

Alternative forms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cae gae nghae chae
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cae”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies