campana

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See also: campaña and Campana

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campana, traditionally taken from Campana (Campanian), from its diocese Nola's having been the supposed location of St Paulinus's introduction of bells to Christian ceremony,[1][2] but sometimes derived from Ancient Greek καπάνη (kapánē, felt helmet) owing to a supposed resemblance of shape.[3]

Noun[edit]

campana (plural campanas)

  1. A church bell, particularly a large bell used in medieval church steeples or towers.[1][3][4]
  2. A bell-shaped vase.
  3. (obsolete, botany) A bell-shaped flower, particularly the pasque flower.
  4. (obsolete, architecture) The body of a capital of the Corinthian order.
  5. (obsolete, architecture) A drop of a Doric architrave.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Encyclopædia Britannica, 9th ed., "Bell".
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "campana, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1888.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Walters, Henry Beauchamp. Church Bells of England, p. 3.
  4. ^ Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Music, Vol. 2, p. 452.

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanas)

  1. bell

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Latin Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanes)

  1. bell (percussive instrument)

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Latin Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campane)

  1. bell

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Traditionally taken from Campana (Campanian), from its diocese Nola's having been the supposed location of St Paulinus's introduction of bells to Christian ceremony[1][2] (see also nola), but sometimes derived from Ancient Greek καπάνη (kapánē, felt helmet) owing to a supposed resemblance of shape.[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

campana f (genitive campanae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin, Medieval Latin) a large bell used in late classical or medieval church towers or steeples.
  2. (Late Latin, Medieval Latin) a tower for such a bell, a campanile, belfry

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative campana campanae
Genitive campanae campanārum
Dative campanae campanīs
Accusative campanam campanās
Ablative campanā campanīs
Vocative campana campanae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica, 9th ed., "Bell".
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "campana, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1888.
  3. ^ Walters, Henry Beauchamp. Church Bells of England, p. 3.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Latin Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kamˈpana/, [kãmˈpana]

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanas)

  1. bell
  2. a bell-shaped (or roughly) object or component (such as the canopy of a parachute)
  3. hood (device to suck away smokes and fumes)
  4. extractor hood

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]