campana

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: campaña and Campana

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin campana, traditionally taken from Campana (Campanian), from its diocese Nola's having been the supposed location of St Paulinus's introduction of bells to Christian ceremony,[1][2] but sometimes derived from Ancient Greek καπάνη (kapánē, felt helmet) owing to a supposed resemblance of shape.[3]

Noun[edit]

campana (plural campanas)

  1. A church bell, particularly a large bell used in medieval church steeples or towers.[1][3][4]
  2. A bell-shaped vase.
  3. (obsolete, botany) A bell-shaped flower, particularly the pasque flower.
  4. (obsolete, architecture) The body of a capital of the Corinthian order.
  5. (obsolete, architecture) A drop of a Doric architrave.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Encyclopædia Britannica, 9th ed., "Bell".
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "campana, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1888.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Walters, Henry Beauchamp. Church Bells of England, p. 3.
  4. ^ Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Music, Vol. 2, p. 452.

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanas)

  1. bell

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanes)

  1. bell (percussive instrument)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanes)

  1. bell

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campane)

  1. bell

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Traditionally taken from Campāna (Campanian), from its diocese Nola's having been the supposed location of St Paulinus's introduction of bells to Christian ceremony[1][2] (see also nola), but sometimes derived from Ancient Greek καπάνη (kapánē, felt helmet) owing to a supposed resemblance of shape.[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

campāna f (genitive campānae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin, Medieval Latin) a large bell used in late classical or medieval church towers or steeples.
  2. (Late Latin, Medieval Latin) a tower for such a bell, a campanile, belfry

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative campāna campānae
Genitive campānae campānārum
Dative campānae campānīs
Accusative campānam campānās
Ablative campānā campānīs
Vocative campāna campānae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • campana in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • campana in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • campana in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • campana in Harry Thurston Peck, editor, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1898
  • campana in Ramminger, Johann, Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016, retrieved 16 July 2016
  • campana in William Smith et al., editor, A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin, 1890
  1. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica, 9th ed., "Bell".
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "campana, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1888.
  3. ^ Walters, Henry Beauchamp. Church Bells of England, p. 3.

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanas)

  1. bell
  2. straw foxglove (Digitalis lutea L.)[1]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gui Benoèt, "Las plantas", 2008, Toulouse, IEO Edicions, 2008, →ISBN, p. 99.

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin campāna (stilyard; bell), from Latin Campāna, feminine of Campānus (of Campania), from Campānia (a region of Italy in which bronze was produced), from campus (open or flat space; plain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kamˈpana/, [kãmˈpa.na]

Noun[edit]

campana f (plural campanas)

  1. bell
  2. a bell-shaped (or roughly) object or component (such as the canopy of a parachute)
  3. hood (device to suck away smokes and fumes)
  4. extractor hood
    Synonyms: campana extractora, extractora
  5. cloche, tableware cover, usually metalic
    Synonym: cubreplatos

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]