parachute

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See also: parachuté

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A man with a parachute

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French parachute, from para- (protection against) (as in parasol) and chute (fall).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpæɹəʃuːt/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

parachute (plural parachutes)

  1. (aviation) A device, generally constructed from fabric, that is designed to employ air resistance to control the fall of an object or person, causing them to float instead of falling.
  2. (zoology) A web or fold of skin extending between the legs of gliding mammals, such as the flying squirrel and colugo.
  3. (BDSM) A small collar which fastens around the scrotum and from which weights can be hung.
    • 1998, Guillaume Dustan, Brad Rumph, transl., In My Room, London: Serpent’s Tail, →ISBN, page 53:
      Under that there are dildos and butt-plugs arranged by size on two shelves: two fat butt-plugs and four small ones, four two-headed dildos, eight ordinary dildos. Under that, the little material hanging on nails: five different pairs of nipple clamps, some clothespins, a parachute for the balls, a dog collar, two hoods, one in leather, one in latex, six cockrings, in steel or leather, regular or with built-in ball-squeezers, two dick sheaths []
    • 2012, Peggy Sue, Guide to Female Supremacy, London: Gynarchy International Editions / Lulu Press, →ISBN, page 75:
      Parachutes are usually made of leather and can be purchased through most fetish catalogs or stores catering to the BDSM scene.
    • 2016, John Caesar, Wife Scorned!, Lulu.com, →ISBN:
      She came near and grabbed his balls tightly with her left hand, tugging them downward while applying a parachute harness with her right hand. [] His balls stretched downward under the delicious weight.
    • 2022, Mohamed A. Baky Fahmy, “Scrotum in Human Conscience”, in Mohamed A. Baky Fahmy, editor, Normal and Abnormal Scrotum, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, DOI:10.1007/978-3-030-83305-3_3, →ISBN, page 22:
      A parachute is a small collar, usually made from leather, which fastens around the scrotum, and from which weights can be hung.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

parachute (third-person singular simple present parachutes, present participle parachuting, simple past and past participle parachuted)

  1. (intransitive) To jump, fall, descend, etc. using such a device.
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.
  2. (transitive) To introduce into a place using such a device.
    The soldiers were parachuted behind enemy lines.
  3. (transitive) To place (somebody) in an organisation in a position of authority without their having previous experience there; used with in or into.

Translations[edit]

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References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French parachute.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌpaː.raːˈʃyt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pa‧ra‧chute
  • Rhymes: -yt

Noun[edit]

parachute m (plural parachutes, diminutive parachuutje n)

  1. parachute
    Synonym: valscherm

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Papiamentu: parachüt

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From para- (protection against) +‎ chute (fall).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

parachute m (plural parachutes)

  1. parachute (device designed to control the fall of an object)
  2. (BDSM) parachute (scrotum collar from which weights can be hung)
    • 1996, Guillaume Dustan, Dans ma chambre [In My Room], Paris: POL, page 71; quoted in David Caron, My Father and I: The Marais and the Queerness of Community (in English), Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 2009, →ISBN, page 106:
      En dessous il y a les godes et les plugs, rangés par taille sur deux étagères: deux gros plugs, quatre petits, quatre godes doubles, huit godes simples. En dessous il y a le petit matériel, accroché à des clous: cinq paires de pinces à seins différentes, des pinces à linge, un parachute pour les couilles, tin collier de chien, deux cagoules, une en cuir, une en latex, six cockrings, en acier, en cuir, simples ou avec serre-couilles incorporé, deux étuis à bite []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Derived terms[edit]

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