canopy

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English canope, from Latin cōnōpēum(curtain) (ultimately from Ancient Greek κωνωπεῖον(kōnōpeîon)), through Medieval Latin canopeum, or possibly Old French conope, conopé (compare modern French canapé).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canopy ‎(plural canopies)

  1. A high cover providing shelter, such as a cloth supported above an object, particularly over a bed.
    • Dryden
      golden canopies and beds of state
  2. Any overhanging or projecting roof structure, typically over entrances or doors.
  3. The zone of the highest foliage and branches of a forest.
  4. In an airplane, the transparent cockpit cover.
  5. In a parachute, the cloth that fills with air and thus limits the falling speed.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

canopy ‎(third-person singular simple present canopies, present participle canopying, simple past and past participle canopied)

  1. (transitive) To cover with or as if with a canopy.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act I, Scene 1,[1]
      Away before me to sweet beds of flowers:
      Love-thoughts lie rich when canopied with bowers.
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus, lines 543-5,[2]
      I sat me down to watch upon a bank
      With ivy canopied, and interwove
      With flaunting honeysuckle []
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, Franklenstein, Chapter 11,[3]
      I began also to observe, with greater accuracy, the forms that surrounded me, and to perceive the boundaries of the radiant roof of light which canopied me.
    • 1850, The Madras Journal of Literature and Science, Vol. XVI, No. 38, Vepery: J.P. Bantleman, p. 366,[4]
      The walls of the vestibule and passage passing round the sanctuary, are covered with compartments holding high reliefs of Buddha seated on a lotus, the stem of which is grasped by two figures wearing wigs and tiaras, canopied by snakes; []
  2. (intransitive) To go through the canopy of a forest on a zipline.
    • 2013, Tara Morris, “Canopying In Rio Claro,” colombiareports.com, 11 March, 2013,[5]
      If you’re looking for a little adventure in Colombia, look no further than canopying through Rio Claro’s lush, secluded jungle, located just five hours bus ride from either Medellin or Bogota.

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

canopy m ‎(uncountable)

  1. (Caribbean) zipline (activity)