carnage

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Middle French carnage, from a Norman or Picard variant Old Northern French) of Old French charnage, from char ‎(flesh), or from Vulgar Latin *carnaticum ‎(slaughter of animals), itself from Latin carnem, accusative of caro ‎(flesh).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carnage ‎(usually uncountable, plural carnages)

  1. Death and destruction.
  2. What remains after a massacre, e.g. the corpses or gore.
  3. (figuratively, slang) Any chaotic situation.
    • 2014, Simon Spence, Happy Mondays: Excess All Areas
      The lads had recently returned from a wild summer on the party island of Ibiza, an increasingly popular hotspot for working-class British youth. But this was not a scene of drunken holiday carnage in tacky discos.
    • 2015, Adam Jones, Bomb: My Autobiography
      Within three hours we'd drunk the place dry. Miraculously, we all made it back on the bus, but I've never seen a more bacchanalian scene of wanton debauchery than the ride back to the hotel. It was total carnage.

Synonyms[edit]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French carnage, itself probably from a Norman or Picard (Old Northern French) variant of Old French charnage, itself from char (cf. chair ‎(flesh)), or from a Vulgar Latin *carnaticum ‎(slaughter of animals), from Latin carō, carnem. Cf. also Old Provençal carnatge, Italian carnaggio.

Noun[edit]

carnage m ‎(plural carnages)

  1. carnage (all senses)

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from a Norman or Picard (Old Northern French) variant of Old French charnage, itself from char ‎(flesh), or from a Vulgar Latin *carnaticum ‎(slaughter of animals), from Latin carō, carnem.

Noun[edit]

carnage m (plural carnages)

  1. a piece of meat used as bait

Descendants[edit]