carnage

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French carnage [1], from a Norman or Picard variant Old Northern French) of Old French charnage, from char (flesh), or from Vulgar Latin *carnaticum (slaughter of animals), itself from Latin carnem, accusative of caro (flesh).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɑː.nɪdʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑɹ.nɪdʒ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

carnage (usually uncountable, plural carnages)

  1. Death and destruction.
    Synonyms: massacre, bloodbath
  2. The corpses, gore, etc. that remain after a massacre.
  3. (figuratively, sports) Any great loss by a team; a game in which one team wins overwhelmingly.
  4. (figuratively, slang) Any chaotic situation.
    • 2014, Simon Spence, Happy Mondays: Excess All Areas:
      The lads had recently returned from a wild summer on the party island of Ibiza, an increasingly popular hotspot for working-class British youth. But this was not a scene of drunken holiday carnage in tacky discos.
    • 2015, Adam Jones, Bomb: My Autobiography:
      Within three hours we'd drunk the place dry. Miraculously, we all made it back on the bus, but I've never seen a more bacchanalian scene of wanton debauchery than the ride back to the hotel. It was total carnage.
    • 2017 January 20, Donald Trump, The Inaugural Address[1]:
      Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities, rusted out factories, scattered like tombstones across the across the landscape of our nation, an education system flush with cash, but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge, and the crime, and the gangs, and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential. This American carnage stops right here and stops right now.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “carnage”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French carnage, itself probably from a Norman or Picard (Old Northern French) variant of Old French charnage, itself from char (see also chair (flesh)), or from a Medieval Latin carnaticum (slaughter of animals), from Latin carō, carnem. See also Old Occitan carnatge, Italian carnaggio.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carnage m (plural carnages)

  1. carnage (all senses)

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from a Norman or Picard (Old Northern French) variant of Old French charnage, itself from char (flesh), or from a Medieval Latin carnaticum (slaughter of animals), from Latin carō, carnem.

Noun[edit]

carnage m (plural carnages)

  1. a piece of meat used as bait

Descendants[edit]

  • English: carnage
  • French: carnage

References[edit]

  • charnage on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)