cicuta

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See also: Cicuta

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cicūta.

Noun[edit]

cicuta (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Hemlock.
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , II.4.1.ii:
      cicuta, or hemlock, is a strong poison in Greece, but with us it hath no such violent effects […].

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cicūta.

Noun[edit]

cicuta f (plural cicute)

  1. hemlock

Anagrams[edit]

[[Category:it]]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the same Proto-Indo-European source as English kex, Cornish cegas, and Welsh cegid (hemlock).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cicūta f (genitive cicūtae); first declension

  1. a plant, poison hemlock, probably either Conium maculatum or Cicuta virosa
  2. the juice of the hemlock given to prisoners as poison
  3. a pipe or flute made from the stalks or stems of the hemlock

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cicūta cicūtae
genitive cicūtae cicūtārum
dative cicūtae cicūtīs
accusative cicūtam cicūtās
ablative cicūtā cicūtīs
vocative cicūta cicūtae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Siegfried, Miscellanea Celtica, p. 32

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cicuta (hemlock; pipe). Compare the inherited doublet cegude.

Noun[edit]

cicuta f (plural cicutas)

  1. hemlock (poisonous plant of genus Conium)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cicuta (hemlock; pipe).

Noun[edit]

cicuta f (plural cicutas)

  1. hemlock