clausus

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Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perfect passive participle of claudō (I shut, close).

Pronunciation[edit]

Participle[edit]

clausus (feminine clausa, neuter clausum, comparative clausior); first/second-declension participle

  1. closed, inaccessible; having been closed
  2. enclosed, having been shut off
  3. shut, shut up, sealed, having been locked up
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.117-118:
      quicquid ubīque vidēs, caelum, mare, nūbila, terrās,
      omnia sunt nostra clausa patentque manū.
      Whatever thou beholdest around thee, the sky, the sea, the air, the earth , all these have been shut up and are opened by my hand.
      1851. The Fasti &c of Ovid. Translated by H. T. Riley. London: H. G. Bohn. pg. 11.
  4. (figuratively, of a person) deaf, unhearing, unreachable

Declension[edit]

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative clausus clausa clausum clausī clausae clausa
Genitive clausī clausae clausī clausōrum clausārum clausōrum
Dative clausō clausō clausīs
Accusative clausum clausam clausum clausōs clausās clausa
Ablative clausō clausā clausō clausīs
Vocative clause clausa clausum clausī clausae clausa

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also clūsus.

  • Northern Gallo-Romance:
    • Old French: clos
  • Southern Gallo-Romance:
  • Ibero-Romance:

References[edit]

  • clausus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • clausus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • clausus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • clausus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to keep the coast and harbours in a state of blockade: litora ac portus custodia clausos tenere
  • clausus”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray