clerical

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See also: clérical

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin clēricālis (clerical), from clēricus (clergyman, priest).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈklɛɹɪkəl/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

clerical (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to clerks or their work.
  2. Of or relating to the clergy.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

clerical (plural clericals)

  1. A member of the clergy.

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin clēricālis (clerical)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

clerical (masculine and feminine plural clericals)

  1. clerical (of or relating to the clergy)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin clēricālis (clerical)

Adjective[edit]

clerical m or f (plural clericais)

  1. clerical (of or relating to the clergy)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin clēricālis (clerical), from clēricus (clergyman, priest).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

clerical (plural clericais, comparable)

  1. clerical (of or relating to the clergy)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • clerical” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French clérical, from Latin clericalis.

Adjective[edit]

clerical m or n (feminine singular clericală, masculine plural clericali, feminine and neuter plural clericale)

  1. clerical

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin clēricālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kleɾiˈkal/, [kle.ɾiˈkal]

Adjective[edit]

clerical (plural clericales)

  1. (relational) clergy; clerical (of or relating to the clergy)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]