clochard

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French clochard.

Noun[edit]

clochard (plural clochards)

  1. A beggar or tramp, especially in France.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 492:
      He nearly fell over the Pont Neuf, enjoyed the conversation and esteem of several hairy clochards, and was finally knocked down by a taxi in the Place Vendôme []
    • 2000, JG Ballard, Super-Cannes, Fourth Estate 2011, p. 92:
      ‘Those clochards in Cannes, mostly old soixante-huitards. They see a tribute to modern industrial genius and can't resist giving it a swift kick.’

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French clochard.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /klɔˈʃaːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: clo‧chard

Noun[edit]

clochard m (plural clochards, diminutive clochardje n)

  1. vagrant

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Disputed. One possible etymology is clocher (to limp) +‎ -ard, another one is from cloche (clumsy person, oaf)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clochard m (plural clochards, feminine clocharde)

  1. (now usually derogatory) tramp; vagrant
    • 1993, Patrick Gaboriau, Clochard. L'univers d'un groupe de sans-abri parisiens.
      La vie quotidienne des clochards est mal connue.
      The everyday life of vagrants is poorly known.
    Synonym: clodo

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: clochard
  • English: clochard
  • Italian: clochard

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French clochard.

Noun[edit]

clochard m or f (invariable)

  1. (now non derogatory) tramp, vagrant, homeless
    (now derogatory) Synonym: barbone

Further reading[edit]

  • clochard in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana