colonia

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin colōnia (colony), from colōnus (farmer; colonist), from colō (till, cultivate, worship).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Stress: colònia, IPA(key): /koˈlɔnja/

Noun[edit]

colonia f (plural colonie)

  1. colony
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Stress: colònia, IPA(key): /koˈlɔnja/

Noun[edit]

colonia f (plural colonie)

  1. cologne, eau de Cologne
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Stress: colonìa, IPA(key): /koloˈni.a/

Noun[edit]

colonia f (plural colonie)

  1. holding (farm)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

colonia f (plural colonie)

  1. resort
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From colōnus (farmer; colonist), from colō (till, cultivate, worship).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

colōnia f (genitive colōniae); first declension

  1. A colony, settlement.
  2. A possession in land, land attached to a farm, estate.
  3. (metonymically) The people composing a colony, colonists.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative colōnia colōniae
genitive colōniae colōniārum
dative colōniae colōniīs
accusative colōniam colōniās
ablative colōniā colōniīs
vocative colōnia colōniae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • colonia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • colonia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • colonia” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to found a colony somewhere: coloniam deducere in aliquem locum (vid. sect. XII. 1, note Notice too...)
    • to found a colony: coloniam constituere (Leg. Agr. 1. 5. 16)
  • colonia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • colonia in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • colonia in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • colonia in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin colōnia (colony), from colōnus (farmer; colonist), from colō (till, cultivate, worship).

Noun[edit]

colonia f (plural colonias)

  1. colony
  2. (Mexico) neighbourhood

Related terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • In Mexico it is usually shortened and capitalized as "Col." in addresses, where it has postal value and is obligatory (or fraccionamiento, or barrio), alongside of postal code (zip code).

See also[edit]