coriander

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English[edit]

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Coriander seeds, dried.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English coriandre, from Anglo-Norman coriandre, from Old French corïandre, from Latin coriandrum, from Ancient Greek κορίανδρον (koríandron), of uncertain origin. Doublet of cilantro.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coriander (usually uncountable, plural corianders)

  1. (UK) The annual herb Coriandrum sativum, used in many cuisines.
    • 1940, Rosetta E. Clarkson, Green Enchantments: The Magic Spell of Gardens, The Macmillan Company, page 253:
      The life of one plant would be affected by another. Rue was definitely hostile to basil, rosemary to hyssop, but coriander, dill and chervil lived on the friendliest of terms[.]
  2. (US) The dried fruits thereof, used as a spice.

Synonyms[edit]

Meronyms[edit]

  • (Coriandum sativum): cilantro (US, the leaves, when fresh); in other dialects, this, too, like the rest of the plant, is called coriander

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Japanese: コリアンダー (koriandā)

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010), “κορίαννον”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 754

Anagrams[edit]