coriander

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English[edit]

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Coriander seeds, dried.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English coriandre, from Anglo-Norman coriandre, from Old French corïandre, from Latin coriandrum, from Ancient Greek κορίανδρον (koríandron), of uncertain origin.

Compare Ancient Greek κορίαννον (koríannon), κορίαμβλον (koríamblon), Mycenaean Greek [script needed] (ko-ri-a2-da-na), [script needed] (ko-ri-ja-da-na), [script needed] (ko-ri-ja-do-no), [script needed] (ko-ri-jo-da-na), and Akkadian 𒌑𒄷𒌷𒌝 (úḫurium).

Beekes supposes that cluster -dn- implies a Pre-Greek word, and hypothesizes that *koriaⁿdro- may have dissimilated to *koriaⁿdno-.

Doublet of cilantro.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coriander (usually uncountable, plural corianders)

  1. The annual herb Coriandrum sativum, used in many cuisines.
  2. The dried fruits thereof, used as a spice.

Synonyms[edit]

Meronyms[edit]

  • (Coriandum sativum): cilantro (US, the leaves, when fresh); in other dialects, this, too, like the rest of the plant, is called coriander

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]