dios

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See also: Dios and dios-

Asturian[edit]

Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Latin deus.

Interjection[edit]

dios

  1. God! oh my God!

Noun[edit]

dios m (plural dioses)

  1. god

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

diōs

  1. accusative masculine plural of dius

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin deus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *deywós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dios m (plural dioses)

  1. god, deity
    • c. 1200, Almeric, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 50r. a.
      Seńor dios de iſrl' no a tal / dios en los cielos cuemo tu ní de yuſo en la tierra […]
      Lord, God of Israel, there is no god like you in the heavens or on earth […]

Descendants[edit]

  • Ladino: dio
  • Spanish: dios (see there for further descendants)

Proper noun[edit]

dios m

  1. God, the Judeo-Christian god
    • c. 1200: Almeric, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 1r. a.
      [R] / emont por la gracia de dios. arço / biſpo de Toledo. a don alemeric. arçi / diano de antiochia […]
      Remont, by the grace of God, archbishop of Toledo, to don Almeric, archdeacon of Antioch […]
    • Idem, f. 1r. b.
      El to clerigo almerich. a / Rçidiano de antiochẏa. réde gŕas / adios & atẏ.
      Your cleric Almerich, archdeacon of Antioch, gives thanks to God and to you.

Descendants[edit]

  • Ladino: Dio (Latin spelling)
  • Spanish: Dios

Alternative form[edit]


Palauan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish dios.

Noun[edit]

dios

  1. god
    Dios mo mekngeltengat ra belumamGod bless our country, our island home always

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish dios (cf. Ladino dio), from Latin deus (god, deity), from Old Latin deivos (god, deity), from Proto-Italic *deiwos (god, deity), from Proto-Indo-European *deywós (god, deity), from *dyew- (sky, heaven).

The form is unusual in that it was derived from the Latin nominative instead of the accusative deum. This is probably due to the frequent use of the vocative, for which the nominative form was used in Vulgar Latin. There are similar examples in Old French and Old Occitan, where the word for God may appear in the nominative form regardless of its syntactic function, and in Middle French the forms Dieux and Dieu were used alongside each other. Compare also personal names like the Spanish Carlos, Marcos. Alternatively, or additionally, the word may have been influenced by Ecclesiastical Latin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdjos/, [ˈd̪jos]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

dios m (plural dioses, feminine diosa, feminine plural diosas)

  1. god

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]