dispensator

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dispēnsātor.

Noun[edit]

dispensator (plural dispensators)

  1. A distributor; a person who dispenses.
    Coordinate term: dispensatrix
    • c. 1598, Francis Bacon, An Account of [] Compositions for Alienations:
      dispensators of this her royal favour towards her people

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “dispensator”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.)

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dispēnsō +‎ -tor.

Noun[edit]

dispēnsātor m (genitive dispēnsātōris, feminine dispēnsātrīx); third declension

  1. steward, attendant
  2. treasurer
  3. dispenser

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative dispēnsātor dispēnsātōrēs
Genitive dispēnsātōris dispēnsātōrum
Dative dispēnsātōrī dispēnsātōribus
Accusative dispēnsātōrem dispēnsātōrēs
Ablative dispēnsātōre dispēnsātōribus
Vocative dispēnsātor dispēnsātōrēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • dispensator”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dispensator”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dispensator in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • dispensator in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • dispensator”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dispensator”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French dispensateur or Latin dispensator. By surface analysis, dispensa +‎ -tor.

Adjective[edit]

dispensator m or n (feminine singular dispensatoare, masculine plural dispensatori, feminine and neuter plural dispensatoare)

  1. dispenser

Declension[edit]