ducat

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Ducat, ducât, and dūcat

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French ducat, late Old French ducat, from Old Italian ducato, from Medieval Latin ducatus, from oblique stem of dux (duke; leader). Doublet of duchy.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʌkət/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌkət

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

ducat (plural ducats)

  1. (historical) A gold coin minted by various European nations.
    • c. 1596–1598 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene viii]:
      Shylock: "My daughter! O my ducats! Fled with a Christian! O my Christian ducats! Justice! the law! my ducats, and my daughter!..."
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 166:
      But when the innkeeper saw what kind of goat the lad had, he thought this was a goat worth having, so when the lad had fallen asleep, he took another goat which couldn't make any golden ducats, and put that in its place.
  2. (informal) A coin of the major denomination (dollar, euro, etc.); money in general.
  3. (US, theater, transport, slang) A ticket.
    • 1931 Dashiell Hammett, The Glass Key, Vintage Books, (1972), Chapter IV, "The Dog House", part 1, pg. 73
      Ned Beaumont said, "Well, I've got a ducat that reads to there, anyway."
    • 1946, George Johnston, Skyscrapers in the Mist, page 88:
      Customers are usually enticed in with a "ducat", or pass for one free dance.
    • 1949, June 11, Billboard
      [] the lines at the box office since ducats went on sale publicly Wednesday []

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ducat m (plural ducats)

  1. duchy

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from late Old French, borrowed from Italian ducato, from Medieval Latin ducātus, from dux (duke; leader). Compare also duché.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ducat m (plural ducats)

  1. (numismatics) ducat

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dūcat

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of dūcō

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ducatus. Cognate with French duché, Catalan ducat, Italian ducato.

Noun[edit]

ducat m (plural ducats)

  1. duchy

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Old French. From Italian ducato, from Medieval Latin ducatus, from oblique stem of dux (duke; leader).

Noun[edit]

ducat m (oblique plural ducaz or ducatz, nominative singular ducaz or ducatz, nominative plural ducat)

  1. ducat (historical coin)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: ducat
  • French: ducat

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian ducato.

Noun[edit]

ducat m (plural ducate)

  1. dukedom, duchy

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dùːt͡sat/, /dúːt͡sat/

Noun[edit]

dūcat m inan

  1. dozen, 12

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. dūcat
gen. sing. dūcata
singular dual plural
nominative dūcat dūcata dūcati
accusative dūcat dūcata dūcate
genitive dūcata dūcatov dūcatov
dative dūcatu dūcatoma dūcatom
locative dūcatu dūcatih dūcatih
instrumental dūcatom dūcatoma dūcati

Further reading[edit]

  • ducat”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran