duf

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Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *dupsa, from Proto-Indo-European *dheu- 'blow, smoke; dark, gray, deep'. Compare Old English dofian (rage), Dutch dof, Middle High German top (senseless, brainless, crazy), Ancient Greek τῦφος (tûphos, smoke, steam, dense smoke; wooziness, folly, silly pride), Latin suffio (to fumigate), Old Norse dyja (to shake).

Noun[edit]

duf m

  1. air blow, anger, impatience, rage
Related terms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

duf (comparative duffer, superlative dufst)

  1. unable to think clearly
  2. boring, uninteresting
  3. fusty, moldy

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of duf
uninflected duf
inflected duffe
comparative duffer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial duf duffer het dufst
het dufste
indefinite m./f. sing. duffe duffere dufste
n. sing. duf duffer dufste
plural duffe duffere dufste
definite duffe duffere dufste
partitive dufs duffers

Synonyms[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old Norse dýfa (to dip), English dive, from Proto-Germanic *dūbijaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dūf

  1. dip bread in lard of fatty meat, broth or cream
    han hȧdd sä fett i kött du skull få duf däg mätten å flatt i gryta
    He had such fatty meat, that one could dip the bread in the lard in the pot and thereby become full.

References[edit]

  • Stenberg, Pehr, Widmark, Gusten, “duva v dūf”, in Ordbok över Umemålet [Dictionary of the Umeå speech], ISBN 91-7222-016-3, page 23
  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “DUV’”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 107