factotum

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See also: factótum

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin factotum ‎(literally do everything), from Latin fac, present singular imperative of faciō ‎(do, make) + tōtum ‎(everything); attested in English from 1566.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

factotum ‎(plural factotums)

  1. (dated) A person having many diverse activities or responsibilities.
  2. (dated) A general servant.
    • 1847, Herman Melville, Omoo, Chapter 73,
      I had almost forgotten Monee, the grinning old man who prepared our meal. […] He was Po-Po’s factotum—cook, butler, and climber of the bread-fruit and cocoa-nut trees; and, added to all else, a mighty favourite with his mistress; with whom he would sit smoking and gossiping by the hour.
  3. A jack of all trades.
  4. An individual employed to do all sorts of duties.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɑkˈtoː.tʏm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fac‧to‧tum

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin factotum ‎(literally do everything), from Latin fac, present singular imperative of faciō ‎(do, make) + tōtum ‎(everything).

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.
Particularly: “derived directly from la, or via en?”

Noun[edit]

factotum m ‎(plural factotums, diminutive factotumpje n)

  1. factotum (jack-of-all-trades)

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

factotum m ‎(invariable)

  1. An individual employed to do all sorts of duties.