fleam

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fleme, fleom, from Old French flieme, flemie (open vein), probably via a Germanic source (compare Old Saxon flēma, Old High German fliotuma, fliodema, Old English flȳtme, flītme (fleam, lancet)), borrowed from Vulgar Latin fletoma, *fletomus, from Late Latin flebotomus, phlebotomus, from Ancient Greek φλεβοτόμον (phlebotómon). Compare Modern French flamme, Dutch vlijm, German Fliete, Danish flitte (fleam).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fleam (plural fleams)

  1. A sharp instrument used to open a vein, to lance gums, or the like.
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Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English fleem, flem (the rushing of water; current), probably from Old English flēam (fleeing; flight; rush), from Proto-Germanic *flaumaz (stream; current; flood), from Proto-Indo-European *plew- (to fly; flow; run). Cognate with dialectal Norwegian flaum (flood).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fleam (plural fleams)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, Northern England) The watercourse or runoff from a mill; millstream
  2. (Britain, dialectal, Northern England) A large trench or gully cut into a meadow in order to drain it

Related terms[edit]

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Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

fleam

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of fleō