escape

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See also: escapé

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Pelicans escaping from slamming wave

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman and Old Northern French escaper ( = Old French eschaper, modern French échapper), from Vulgar Latin *excappāre, from Latin ex- (out) + capio (capture).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈskeɪp/, /əˈskeɪp/, /ɛˈskeɪp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪp

Verb[edit]

escape (third-person singular simple present escapes, present participle escaping, simple past and past participle escaped)

  1. (intransitive) To get free, to free oneself.
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36: 
      It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: perhaps out of a desire to escape the gravity of this world or to get a preview of the next; […].
    The prisoners escaped by jumping over a wall.
  2. (transitive) To avoid (any unpleasant person or thing); to elude, get away from.
    • Shakespeare
      sailors that escaped the wreck
    • 2011 March 1, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Man Utd”, BBC:
      Luiz was Chelsea's stand-out performer, although Ferguson also had a case when he questioned how the £21m defender escaped a red card after the break for a hack at Rooney, with the Brazilian having already been booked.
    He only got a fine and so escaped going to jail.
    The children climbed out of the window to escape the fire.
  3. (intransitive) To avoid capture; to get away with something, avoid punishment.
    Luckily, I escaped with only a fine.
  4. (transitive) To elude the observation or notice of; to not be seen or remembered by.
    The name of the hotel escapes me at present.
    • Ludlow
      They escaped the search of the enemy.
  5. (transitive, computing) To cause (a single character, or all such characters in a string) to be interpreted literally, instead of with any special meaning it would usually have in the same context, often by prefixing with another character.
    • 1998 August, Tim Berners-Lee et al., Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax (RFC 2396), page 8:
      If the data for a URI component would conflict with the reserved purpose, then the conflicting data must be escaped before forming the URI.
    • 2002, Scott Worley, “Using XML in ASP.NET Applications”, in Inside ASP.NET, ISBN 0735711356, page 214:
      Character Data tags allow you to place complex strings as the text of an element—without the need to manually escape the string.
    • 2007, Michael Cross, “Code Auditing and Reverse Engineering”, in Developer's Guide to Web Application Security, ISBN 159749061X, page 213:
      Therefore, what follows is a list of typical output functions; your job is to determine if any of the functions print out tainted data that has not been passed through some sort of HTML escaping function.
    When using the "bash" shell, you can escape the ampersand character with a backslash.
    Brion escaped the double quote character on Windows by adding a second double quote within the literal.
  6. (computing) To halt a program or command by pressing a key (such as the "Esc" key) or combination of keys.

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

escape (plural escapes)

  1. The act of leaving a dangerous or unpleasant situation.
    The prisoners made their escape by digging a tunnel.
  2. (computing) escape key
  3. (programming) The text character represented by 27 (decimal) or 1B (hexadecimal).
    You forgot to insert an escape in the datastream.
  4. (snooker) A successful shot from a snooker position.
  5. (manufacturing) A defective product that is allowed to leave a manufacturing facility.
  6. (obsolete) That which escapes attention or restraint; a mistake, oversight, or transgression.
    • Burton
      I should have been more accurate, and corrected all those former escapes.
  7. Leakage or outflow, as of steam or a liquid, or an electric current through defective insulation.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

escape

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of escapar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of escapar

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

escape m (invariable)

  1. (computing) The escape key

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

escape

  1. First-person singular (eu) affirmative imperative of escapar
  2. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of escapar
  3. First-person singular (eu) negative imperative of escapar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of escapar
  5. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of escapar
  6. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of escapar

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape
  2. leak
  3. exhaust pipe, tailpipe

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

escape

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of escapar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of escapar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of escapar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of escapar.