fraga

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See also: Fraga, fragă, fräga, and fråga

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

13th century, from Old Galician and Old Portuguese, from an Iberian Vulgar Latin fraga, plural of fragum, from fragōsus (rough), from fragor, from frangō (break, shatter).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fraga f (plural fragas)

Fragas do Eume natural park
  1. an isolated forest with deciduous trees, herbs, mosses, lichens and a diverse fauna[1]
    • 1948, Revista de Guimarães, volumes 58–60, page 303:
      Iba sempre a cabalo, pois tiña que andar máis de catro légoas por fragas, devesas e caborcos.
      He always rode a horse, as he had to travel over four leagues through isolated forests, sparse woods and gullies.
  2. rock, outcrop

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • fraga” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • fraga” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • fraga” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • fraga” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fraga” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ [1]”, Portal das Palabras.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin frāga, noun use of the plural form of Classical Latin frāgum (strawberry).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfra.ɡa/
  • Rhymes: -aɡa
  • Hyphenation: frà‧ga

Noun[edit]

fraga f (plural fraghe)

  1. (obsolete or regional) Synonym of fragola (strawberry)

References[edit]

  • fraga in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

frāga

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of frāgum

References[edit]

  • fraga”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fraga”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fraga in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fraga”, in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin frāga, from frāgum. Compare Catalan fraula, Italian fragola, among others.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɾa.ɣɔ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fra‧ga

Noun[edit]

fraga f (plural fragas)

  1. strawberry
    Synonym: majofa f

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *frāgu, from Proto-Germanic *frēgō. Related to Old English fræġn.

Noun[edit]

frāga f

  1. question
    Synonym: frāgan

Descendants[edit]

  • German: Frage
    • Yiddish: פֿראַגע(frage)
  • Hunsrik: Froh
  • Luxembourgish: Fro
  • Vilamovian: frög

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Old English fræġn and the verb frignan (to ask), from Proto-West Germanic *fregnan.

Noun[edit]

frāga f

  1. question

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese fraga (compare Galician fraga), from Iberian Vulgar Latin fraga, plural of fragum (compare also Catalan and Occitan frau), from fragōsus (rough), from fragor, from frangō (break, shatter); cf. also fragilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: fra‧ga
  • Rhymes: -aɡɐ

Noun[edit]

fraga f (plural fragas)

  1. cliff

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fraga f

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of fragă

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English flag or Dutch vlag.

Noun[edit]

fraga

  1. flag