full-blown

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From full +‎ blow (to blossom).

Adjective[edit]

full-blown (comparative more full-blown, superlative most full-blown)

  1. (figuratively) Completely developed or formed.
    Synonyms: full-fledged, full-bore
    We are in the midst of a full-blown crisis.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, chapter II, in Dracula, New York, N.Y.: Modern Library, OCLC 688657546, pages 16–17:
      Solicitor—for just before leaving London I got word that my examination was successful; and I am now a full-blown solicitor!
    • 2012, Lydia Pyne; Stephen J. Pyne, The Last Lost World, Penguin, →ISBN:
      The Little Ice Age that chilled Europe [] should, according to past precedents, have snowballed into a full-blown ice age.
  2. At the peak of blossom; ripe.
    The trees in the garden were resplendent with full-blown white gardenias.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From full +‎ blow (to produce an air current).

Adjective[edit]

full-blown (comparative more full-blown, superlative most full-blown)

  1. Filled with wind; puffed up.
    The schooner took to sea with full-blown sails.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]