geur

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Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch geur, from Middle Dutch gore.

Noun[edit]

geur (plural geure, diminutive geurtje)

  1. A scent, smell, odour, odor.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch geuren, from Middle Dutch goren.

Verb[edit]

geur (present geur, present participle geurende, past participle gegeur)

  1. (intransitive) to have a smell, to smell

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɣøːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: geur
  • Rhymes: -øːr

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch gore. Related to Dutch goor.

Noun[edit]

geur m (plural geuren, diminutive geurtje n)

  1. A scent, smell, odour, odor.
  2. (figuratively) (notably the diminutive, with the indefinite article: een geurtje) An appearance, something associated, especially in a negative sense
    Ik betrouw dat zaakje niet, er zit een geurtje aan!
    I don't trust that affair, there's something fishy about it!
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: geur

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

geur

  1. first-person singular present indicative of geuren
  2. imperative of geuren

Irish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

geur (genitive singular masculine géir, genitive singular feminine géire, plural geura, comparative géire)

  1. Obsolete spelling of géar

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
geur gheur ngeur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish gér (compare Irish géar, Manx gear, geayr, geyre).

Adjective[edit]

geur (comparative gèire or geòire)

  1. sharp, keen
  2. pungent, acute, virulent
  3. poignant
  4. shrill
  5. bright (intelligent)
  6. incisive
  7. sour, tart
  8. sharp (music)

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
geur gheur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “geur”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gér”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language