incisive

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Middle English (in the sense cutting, penetrating), borrowed from Medieval Latin incīsīvus, from incīdō (to cut in, cut through) +‎ -īvus (-ive, adjectival suffix). Compare Middle French incisif.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈsaɪ.sɪv/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪsɪv

Adjective[edit]

incisive (comparative more incisive, superlative most incisive)

  1. (of a person or mental process) Intelligently analytical and concise.
    1. (of an account) Accurate and sharply focused.
  2. (of an action) Quickly proceeding to judgment and forceful in expression.
    An incisive producer, who expressed vehement disapproval with my pitch upon my first sentence.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      She was like a Beardsley Salome, he had said. And indeed she had the narrow eyes and the high cheekbone of that creature, and as nearly the sinuosity as is compatible with human symmetry. His wooing had been brief but incisive.
    Synonyms: decisive, forthright
  3. Having the quality of incising, cutting, or penetrating, as with a sharp instrument.
    Synonyms: sharp, acute, sarcastic, biting
  4. (anatomy, relational) Of or relating to the incisors.
    the incisive bones, the premaxillaries

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

incisive

  1. feminine singular of incisif

Noun[edit]

incisive f (plural incisives)

  1. incisor (tooth)

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /in.t͡ʃiˈzi.ve/
  • Hyphenation: in‧ci‧sì‧ve

Adjective[edit]

incisive

  1. feminine plural of incisivo

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

incīsīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of incīsīvus