gigolo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in English in 1922.[1] From French gigolo (young lover kept by an older woman), first attested in that sense in 1904 (attested since 1850 in the sense “Amant de cœur, compagnon d'une gigolette", and since 1894 in the sense “elegant young man whose means of livelihood are dubious”),[2][3] a back-formation from gigolette (promiscuous dancing girl, girl available for hire as a dancing partner),[4] attested since 1850, from giguer (to dance), from gigue (fiddle; type of dance; jig). More at jig.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gigolo (plural gigolos)

  1. A man who has a sexual relationship with a woman from whom he receives payment.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:prostitute
  2. A hired escort or dancing partner for a woman.
    • 1929, Irving Caesar (lyrics), Leonello Casucci (music), “Just a Gigolo”:
      I'm just a gigolo / And everywhere I go / People know the part I'm playin' / Paid for every dance / Sellin' each romance / Ooh, what they're sayin'

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 gigolo”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. ^ gigolo” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  3. ^ Dictionnaire étymologique et historique du français (Larousse Références, →ISBN, page 339.
  4. 4.0 4.1 gigolo” in the Collins English Dictionary
  5. ^ Macmillan American English Dictionary, online
  6. 6.0 6.1 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, online
  7. ^ Collins American English Dictionary, online
  8. ^ Macmillan British English Dictionary, online
  9. ^ Harrap's Shorter Dictionary, 8th Edition, page 389

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From gigolette +‎ -lo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gigolo m (plural gigolos)

  1. (informal, derogatory) gigolo

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French gigolo

Noun[edit]

gigolo m (uncountable)

  1. gigolo

Declension[edit]