hospes

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Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin hospes (host).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦɔs.pəs/
  • Hyphenation: hos‧pes

Noun[edit]

hospes m (plural hospites or hospessen)

  1. (chiefly Netherlands) landlord
    Synonyms: kostbaas, kotbaas

Coordinate terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *hostipotis, an old compound of hostis and the root of potis, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstipotis, a compound of *gʰóstis (whence hostis) and *pótis (whence potis). Cognate with Proto-Slavic *gospodь. The noun's declension has been changed to T-stem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hospes m or f (genitive hospitis); third declension

  1. host
  2. guest, visitor
  3. stranger; foreigner

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative hospes hospitēs
Genitive hospitis hospitum
Dative hospitī hospitibus
Accusative hospitem hospitēs
Ablative hospite hospitibus
Vocative hospes hospitēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Aromanian: oaspi, oaspe, ospi
  • Catalan: hoste
  • Old French: oste
  • Friulian: ospit
  • Galician: hóspede
  • Italian: ospite, oste (through Old French)

References[edit]

  • hospes in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hospes in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • hospes in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • hospes in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • hospes in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 291