inhabitable

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

inhabit +‎ -able.

Adjective[edit]

inhabitable (comparative more inhabitable, superlative most inhabitable)

  1. Fit to live in; habitable.
    • a. 1704, John Locke, “Elements of Natural Philosophy”, in A Collection of Several Pieces of Mr. John Locke, London: J. Bettenham for R. Francklin, published 1710, page 190–191:
      It is more ſuitable to the wiſdom, power and greatneſs of God, to think that the fixt Stars are all of them Suns, with Syſtems of inhabitable Planets moving about them, to whoſe Inhabitants he diſplays the marks of his Goodneſs as well as to us []

Usage notes[edit]

While the usage is obsolete, inhabitable can also be an antonym of habitable and have the opposite meaning to that intended. Where such confusion might arise, one may prefer to use habitable or another synonym. Compare inflammable.

Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French inhabitable, from Latin inhabitabilis (uninhabitable)

Adjective[edit]

inhabitable (comparative more inhabitable, superlative most inhabitable)

  1. (obsolete) Not habitable; not suitable to be inhabited.
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, Richard II, [Act I, scene i], lines 62–66:
      [] Which to maintaine, I would allow him oddes, / And meete him, were I tide to runne afoote, / Euen to the frozen ridges of the Alpes, / Or any other ground inhabitable, / Where euer Engliſhman durſt ſet his foote.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French inhabitable, from Latin inhabitabilis (uninhabitable), as if in- +‎ habitable

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inhabitable (plural inhabitables)

  1. uninhabitable

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inhabitable (plural inhabitables)

  1. uninhabitable

Antonyms[edit]