luke

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See also: Luke, lûke, and lǚkè

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English luke, leuke, lewke (lukewarm, tepid), from an unexplained variant or extension of Middle English lewe (warm, lukewarm, tepid), from Old English hlēow (warm), perhaps due to confusion with Old English wlæc (tepid, lukewarm, cool).

Adjective[edit]

luke (not comparable)

  1. (Britain, archaic) lukewarm
    • 1836, Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
      Let me have nine penn'orth o' brandy and water luke, and the inkstand, will you, miss?

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to the verb lukke

Noun[edit]

luke f, m (definite singular luka or luken, indefinite plural luker, definite plural lukene)

  1. a small door (including on an Advent calendar)
  2. a hatch
  3. a window (e.g. ticket window)
  4. a gap, space, slot, opening

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to the verb lukke

Noun[edit]

luke f (definite singular luka, indefinite plural luker, definite plural lukene)

  1. a small door (including on an Advent calendar)
  2. a hatch
  3. a window (e.g. ticket window)
  4. a gap, space, slot, opening

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Noun[edit]

luke (plural lukes)

  1. A look.
  2. An examination, inspection.

Verb[edit]

luke (third-person singular present lukes, present participle lukin, past lukit, past participle lukit)

  1. To look.
  2. To examine, inspect.