hark

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English herken, herkien, from Old English *hercian, *heorcian, *hiercian, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hauzijaną (to hear) + formative/intensive -k (see also the related hīeran, whence English hear). Equivalent to hear +‎ -k. Cognate with Scots herk (to hark), North Frisian harke (to hark), West Frisian harkje (to listen), obsolete Dutch horken (to hark, listen to), Middle Low German horken (to hark), German horchen (to hark, harken to).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: härk, IPA(key): /hɑː(ɹ)k/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(r)k

Verb[edit]

hark (third-person singular simple present harks, present participle harking, simple past and past participle harked)

  1. (archaic, often imperative) To listen attentively.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene i], page 182:
      But harke, I heare the footing of a man.
    • 1739, Charles Wesley; George Whitefield, “Hymn for Christmas-Day”, in Hymns and Sacred Poems:
      Hark! the herald angels sing / Glory to the new born King
    • 1856, Herman Melville, The Lightning Rod Man:
      "Hark! The thunder becomes less muttering. It is nearing us, and nearing the earth, too. Hark! One crammed crash! All the vibrations made one by nearness. Another flash. Hold."
    • 1906, O. Henry, “Between Rounds”, in The Four Million:
      Loud voices and a renewed uproar were raised in front of the boarding-house [] "'Tis Missis Murphy's voice," said Mrs. McCaskey, harking.
    • 1959, Tom Lehrer (lyrics and music), “A Christmas Carol”:
      Hark! The Herald Tribune sings, / Advertising wondrous things!

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

hark (plural harks)

  1. (Scots) A whisper

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin arcus.

Noun[edit]

hark m

  1. bow
  2. arch

Basque[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hark

  1. ergative singular of hura

Pronoun[edit]

hark

  1. ergative singular of hura

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

hark m (plural harken, diminutive harkje n)

  1. rake (garden tool)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

hark

  1. first-person singular present indicative of harken
  2. imperative of harken

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hark n (genitive singular harks, no plural)

  1. noise, tumult, commotion, din

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse harka, harðka (strength of body and mind), from harðr (hard) ( > Westrobothnian hahl) + -ka.

Noun[edit]

hark f (definite harka)

  1. excellence
    hä var harka dell kar
    that's an excellent man

Alternative forms[edit]

Related terms[edit]