hark

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English herken, herkien, from Old English *hercian, *heorcian, *hiercian, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hauzijaną (to hear) + formative/intensive -k (see also the related hīeran, whence English hear). Equivalent to hear +‎ -k. Cognate with Scots herk (to hark), North Frisian harke (to hark), West Frisian harkje (to listen), obsolete Dutch horken (to hark, listen to), Middle Low German horken (to hark), German horchen (to hark, harken to).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: härk, IPA(key): /hɑː(ɹ)k/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)k

Verb[edit]

hark (third-person singular simple present harks, present participle harking, simple past and past participle harked)

  1. (archaic, often imperative) To listen attentively.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

hark (plural harks)

  1. (Scots) A whisper

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin arcus.

Noun[edit]

hark m

  1. bow
  2. arch

Basque[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Southern) /ark/, [ark]
  • IPA(key): (Northern) /hark/, [ɦark]

Determiner[edit]

hark

  1. ergative singular of hura

Pronoun[edit]

hark

  1. ergative singular of hura

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

hark m (plural harken, diminutive harkje n)

  1. rake (garden tool)
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Caribbean Javanese: hareg
  • Papiamentu: harka, hark
  • Saramaccan: hálíki
  • Sranan Tongo: ar'ari, har'hari

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

hark

  1. first-person singular present indicative of harken
  2. imperative of harken

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hark n (genitive singular harks, no plural)

  1. noise, tumult, commotion, din

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse harka, harðka (strength of body and mind), from harðr (hard) ( > Westrobothnian hahl) + -ka.

Noun[edit]

hark f (definite harka)

  1. excellence
    hä var harka dell kar
    that's an excellent man

Alternative forms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English herken, from Old English *hercian.

Verb[edit]

hark

  1. hark
    • 1867, “CASTEALE CUDDE'S LAMENTATION”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 1:
      Come hark to mee.
      Come hark to me.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 102