montage

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

I. K. Bonset [pseudonym; Theo van Doesburg], La matière denaturalisée. Destruction 2. (Denatured Matter. Destruction 2.; c. 1923), from the collection of the Fries Museum in Leeuwarden, Friesland, Netherlands. The work is a collage, a type of montage.

Borrowed from French montage (assembly, set-up), from monter (to mount; to put up) + -age (suffix forming a noun meaning ‘action or result of something’) (from Latin -āticum (suffix forming a noun indicating a state of being resulting from an action)). Monter is derived from Vulgar Latin *montāre, the present active infinitive of *monto (to climb, mount, go up), from mōns, montem (mountain), from Proto-Indo-European *men- (mountain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

montage (countable and uncountable, plural montages)

  1. (countable) A composite work, particularly an artwork, created by assembling or putting together other elements such as pieces of music, pictures, texts, videos, etc. [from early 20th c.]
    • 1936, American Photography, volume 30, New York, N.Y.: American Photographic Pub. Co., ISSN 0097-577X, OCLC 476412204, page 184, column 1:
      Examples of montage are seen in many modern films, and it is not a device which is physically difficult to use. The difficulty lies in the proper conception of the complete montage, for the cameraman must so completely visualize the finished result that he can proceed to assemble the various units without, at any time, seeing them as a whole until the film is processed.
    • 1938, Mario Scacheri; Mabel Scacheri, “Montage, Simple and Multiple”, in The Fun of Photography, New York, N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace & Company, OCLC 1328140, page 295:
      If you have mastered the art of spot printing and dodging, you are ready for something really advanced, a post-graduate course in montage. As a matter of fact, montage used to be called "dodging" by most photographers, and "multiple printing" by the fussy few.
    • 2003, Hanne Bergius, Stephen C. Foster, editor, “Dada Triumphs!”: Dada Berlin, 1917–1923: Artistry of Polarities; Montages – Metamechanics – Manifestations (Crisis and the Arts: The History of Dada; 5), New York, N.Y.: G. K. Hall & Co., →ISBN, page 291:
      In the dissonant dynamics of [Hannah] Höch's simultaneous Dada montages the "nothing" and the "everything" of Dada were related to each other, both pessimistically and in a utopian manner.
    • 2017 July 16, Brandon Nowalk, “Chickens and Dragons Come Home to Roost on Game of Thrones (Newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[1], archived from the original on 4 December 2017:
      Unfortunately, nothing much happens in the rest of the episode either. It gets to the point where a montage is devoted to establishing Sam's monotony at Oldtown.
  2. (uncountable) The art or process of doing this.
    • 1991, Sergei Eisenstein; Michael Glenny, transl., “Montage 1938”, in Michael Glenny and Richard Taylor, editors, S. M. Eisenstein: Selected Works, volume II (Towards a Theory of Montage), London: British Film Institute, →ISBN; republished as Sergei Eisenstein: Selected Works, London: I.B. Tauris, 2010, →ISBN, page 296:
      There was a period in our cinema when montage was proclaimed as being 'everything'. We are now coming to the end of a period where montage has been regarded as 'nothing'. Since we consider montage to be neither 'nothing' nor 'everything', we now think it necessary to recall that montage is as essential a component of film-making as all the other affective elements of cinematography. [] The fact is that the makers of a number of films in recent years have so thoroughly 'parted company' with montage that they even forgot the basic aim and function, inseparable from its cognitive role, which every work of art sets for itself: the function of providing a coherent, consistent exposition of the work's theme, plot, action and events, and their progression both within each sequence and within the film as a whole.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

montage (third-person singular simple present montages, present participle montaging, simple past and past participle montaged)

  1. (transitive) To combine into, or depict as, a montage.
    • 1936, Adrian Brunel, Film Production, London: George Newnes, OCLC 639865267, page 17:
      The Keartons and our staff had out-montaged [Vsevolod] Pudovkin. The result viewed to-day may be somewhat out of date—though I'm not sure—but of one thing I am certain—that it is as fine an example as I know of a maximum effect of cinematic movement achieved by patience in editing.
    • 1941, Keith Henney, editor, Photo Technique, volume III, New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education, OCLC 916466016, page 14:
      The two background photographs shown in Fig. 2 were selected from the office files of Blakeslee-Lane Studios and then montaged together by copying onto a negative.
    • 2004, John K. Grande, “Nature Vision: Nils-Udo”, in Art Nature Dialogues: Interviews with Environmental Artists, Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, →ISBN, page 95:
      Active in the field of environmental art since the 1960s, Nils-Udo builds structures, elaborates on the landscape in a scale that fits, montaging natural materials on site.
    • 2008, Evgeny Dobrenko; Sarah Young, transl., “Shots from Underground: Dialectics of Conspiratorial Imagination”, in Stalinist Cinema and the Production of History: Museum of the Revolution, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, →ISBN, page 243:
      Being ‘talking pictures’, [Mikhail] Romm’s and in particular [Fridrikh] Ermler’s films, based on huge conversation scenes, led both directors to discover a ‘deep mise en scène’, when in order to avoid splitting up the action, ‘the actors themselves, coming out of the depths into the foreground, alter the scale of the portrayal. They montage the film on the move, so to speak, moving along the longitudinal axis of the frame.’
    • 2011, Anna Furse, “Introduction”, in Anna Furse, editor, Theatre in Pieces: Politics, Poetics and Interdisciplinary Collaboration: An Anthology of Play Texts 1966–2010, London; New York, N.Y.: Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, Bloomsbury Publishing, →ISBN, page v:
      There are plays by playwrights and then there are theatre texts. What do I mean by this? [] Texts are woven; they are nets that gather meanings. They are braided, knotted, threaded, sewn, patched together, edited, montaged. They evolve in the process of making performance.
    • 2017, Max R. C. Schleser; Anthony Nevin, “Shifting Our Horizons: Exploring Mobility in Micro Production and Floating Exhibitions”, in Camille C. Baker and Kate Sicchio, editors, Intersecting Art and Technology in Practice: Techne/Technique/Technology (Routledge Advances in Art and Visual Studies), New York, N.Y.; Abingdon, Oxon.: Routledge, →ISBN, page 142:
      Max, who developed creative approaches and methods to use mobile devices and smartphones for moving-image and video production during the last eight years, is interested in further exploring ephemeral media and transcending the moments captured in micro-movies on location into immersive viewing experiences. He montages the first impressions captured on location into abstract micro-movies, which can be screened on mobile devices, tablets, and/or smartphones in any environment.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French montage, from monter (to mount)

Noun[edit]

montage c (singular definite montagen, plural indefinite montager)

  1. montage

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French montage, from monter (to mount) (from mont (mount(ain)), from Latin mons (mountain) +‎ -age.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mon‧ta‧ge

Noun[edit]

montage f (plural montages, diminutive montagetje n)

  1. An assembly
  2. A montage of images, especially cinema editing

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From monter (to mount) (from mont (mount(ain)), from Latin mons (mountain) +‎ -age.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

montage m (plural montages)

  1. assembly, set-up
  2. (film, television) editing

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]