mutatis mutandis

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A borrowing, more or less naturalized, of Late Latin mūtātīs mūtandīs (with [the things] to be changed having been changed), first recorded in English in 1272.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /m(j)uːˌtɑːtɪs muːˈtandɪs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /m(j)uˌtɑdəs m(j)uˈtɑndəs/, /mjuˌteɪdəs mjuˈtændəs/

Adverb[edit]

mutatis mutandis (not comparable)

  1. (dated, law) With the necessary changes being made, with the necessary modifications.
    • a. 1525, The Coventry Leet Book, page 595:
      And like billes, mutatis mutandis, were put In ayenst Gloucestre & Worcestre
    • 1863, H.M.'s Public Record Office, Calendar of State Papers, Foreign Series, of the Reign of Elizabeth, volume VII, page 141:
      26 May 1564. M. to Mr. Tipton, and another (mutatis mutandis) to Mr. Cuerton. Pp. 3.
    • 1962, Samuel Edward Finer, chapter 2, in The Man on Horseback: The Role of the Military in Politics:
      What is said of the army here is to be taken also to apply, mutatis mutandis, to the air force and the navy.
    • 1962, Norman Malcolm, chapter 15, in Dreaming:
      Similar considerations apply, mutatis mutandis, to the example of nightmare imagined by Brown.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Typically treated as an unnaturalized Latin phrase and italicized. Now usually treated as a parenthetical phrase set off inside commas.
  • Even in Legal Latin and academic work, the term has been increasingly uncommon in English since the 1950s. However, it is still seen occasionally in journalism.
  • Usually used when describing similarities between two cases to make allowances for the obvious differences between them (see examples above).

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin mūtātīs mūtandīs (with [the things] to be changed having been changed). For more information, see the English entry.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /muˈtɑːtis muˈtɑndis/

Adverb[edit]

mutatis mutandis

  1. (law) mutatis mutandis (having changed what needs to be changed)
    Unionin kansalaisten karkottamista vastaan saaman suojan järjestelmää ei voida soveltaa mutatis mutandis Turkin kansalaisiin.
    The scheme of protection against expulsion conferred on citizens of the Union cannot be applied mutatis mutandis to Turkish nationals.

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin mūtātīs mūtandīs (with [the things] to be changed having been changed). For more information, see the English entry.

Pronunciation[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
  • IPA(key): /muˈta.tis muˈtan.dis/, [muˌt̪äːt̪iz muˈt̪än̪d̪is]

Adverb[edit]

mutatis mutandis

  1. mutatis mutandis (having changed what needs to be changed)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Literally “with [the things] to be changed having been changed”. Of late derivation: earliest appearance in British Latin, 1272.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mūtātīs mūtandīs

  1. (Late Latin) mutatis mutandis (having changed what needs to be changed)

Usage notes[edit]

  • 1.0 1.1 Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed., “mutatis mutandis, adv.” Oxford University Press (Oxford), 2003.