comma

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See also: coma, čoma, and čomā

English[edit]

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a comma butterfly

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin comma, from Ancient Greek κόμμα(kómma), from κόπτω(kóptō, I cut)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

comma ‎(plural commas or commata)

  1. (typography) The punctuation mark,used to indicate a set off parts of a sentence or between elements of a list.
    • 1828, Richard Thomson, Illustrations of the History of Great Britain, Vol. II, pp. 145–6:
      No points were used by the ancient printers, excepting the colon and the period; but, after some time, a short oblique stroke, called a virgil, was introduced, which answered to the modern comma. In the fifteenth century this punctuation was improved by the famous Aldus Manutius with the typographical art in general; when he gave a better shape to the comma, added the semicolon, and assigned to the former points more proper places.
  2. (Romanian typography) A similar-looking subscript diacritical mark.
  3. A European and North American butterfly, Polygonia c-album, of the family Nymphalidae.
  4. (music) a difference in the calculation of nearly identical intervals by different ways.
  5. (genetics) A delimiting marker between items in a genetic sequence.
  6. In Ancient Greek rhetoric a comma (κόμμα) is a short clause, something less than a colon, originally denoted by comma marks. In antiquity comma was defined as a combination of words that has no more than eight syllables. This term is later applied to longer phrases, e.g. the Johannine comma.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Punctuation

External links[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

comma

  1. third-person singular past historic of commer

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

comma m ‎(plural commi)

  1. (law) subsection
  2. (music) comma

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Ancient Greek κόμμα(kómma), from κόπτω(kóptō, I cut).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

comma n ‎(genitive commatis); third declension

  1. (in grammar):
    1. a comma (a division, member, or section of a period smaller than a colon)
    2. a comma (a mark of punctuation)
  2. (in verse) a caesura

Declension[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative comma commata
genitive commatis commatum
dative commatī commatibus
accusative comma commata
ablative commate commatibus
vocative comma commata

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the works of Cicero and Quintilian, the untransliterated Greek κόμμα(kómma) is used for comma in the grammatical sense of “a division…of a period smaller than a colon”.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]