ntj

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Egyptian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Formed from nt +‎ -j (nisba ending), where nt is a nominalized use of the feminine form of the genitival adjective n(j). The noun ntj is in turn simply a nominalized use of the adjective ntj.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

n
t y
  1. the relative adjective — allows a clause to serve as a relative clause, usually with an adverbial or verbal predicate
    1. (introducing a direct relative clause, with ntj serving in place of a subject) which is, who is, being
    2. (introducing an indirect relative clause, with a later resumptive pronoun) such that, for which, concerning which

Usage notes[edit]

When followed by an indirect relative clause with a pronominal subject, the subject takes the form of a suffix pronoun attached to ntj; in this case ntj is often written without the two strokes representing final -j. The exceptions to this are clauses with a first-person singular subject, which use the dependent pronoun wj, and sometimes a third-person subject, which can use the dependent pronoun st. Other subjects rarely also appear in dependent-pronoun form.

When a direct relative clause is negated, it is given an explicit resumptive subject pronoun after the negative particle rather than having ntj serve in place of a subject. Alternatively, jwtj can be used instead of ntj and a negative particle.

Like jw, ntj asserts that the statement in the clause is true at the time of the statement, marking it as modally realis.

Inflection[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]
  • Coptic: ⲉⲧⲉ- (ete-), Coptic: ⲉⲧ- (et-), Coptic: ⲉⲑ- (eth-)

Antonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

n
t y

 m

  1. (introducing a direct relative clause) he who is, one who is, that which is
  2. (introducing an indirect relative clause, with a later resumptive pronoun) he for whom, one for whom, one such that, that for which
  3. (without a following relative clause) he who exists, one who exists, that which exists

Usage notes[edit]

See under the adjective above.

Inflection[edit]

See under the adjective above.

Alternative forms[edit]

See under the adjective above.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • James P[eter] Allen (2010) Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs, 2nd edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN.