promulgate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin promulgatus, past participle of promulgō (I make known, publish), either from provulgō (I make known, publish), from pro (forth) + vulgō (I publish), or from mulgeō (I milk), latter used in metaphorical sense of “to bring forth”.[1] Compare promulge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

promulgate (third-person singular simple present promulgates, present participle promulgating, simple past and past participle promulgated)

  1. (transitive) To make known or public.
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Othello, Act I, scene ii, page 312, column 1:
      ’Tis yet to know, / Which when I know, that boaſting is an Honour, / I ſhall promulgate. I fetch by life and being, / From Men of Royall Seige.
    • 1784 November 6, William Cowper, “Tirocinium: Or, A Review of Schools”, in Poems, page 303:
      Prieſts have invented, and the world admir’d / What knaviſh prieſts promulgate as inſpir’d ; / ’Till reaſon, now no longer overaw’d, / Reſumes her pow’rs, and ſpurns the clumſy fraud ; / And, common-ſenſe diffuſing real day, / The meteor of the goſpel dies away !
  2. (transitive) To put into effect as a regulation.
    • 1881 June 7, William Stubbs, “The Reign of Henry VIII”, in Seventeen Lectures on the Study of Medieval and Modern History and Kindred Subjects, Oxford: Clarendon Press, published 1887, page 293:
      [] the Statute of Uses was delayed until 1536 and the Statute of Wills until 1540, but both statutes were promulgated in 1532, and formed part of a policy which we may compare, not favourably, with the of Edward I []

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ promulgate” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

Further reading[edit]


Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

promulgate

  1. adverbial present passive participle of promulgar

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

promulgate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of promulgare
  2. second-person plural imperative of promulgare
  3. feminine plural of promulgato

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

prōmulgāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of prōmulgō